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Author Topic: Tue., 10/28 Grabowski & Venzke  (Read 1775 times)

magus

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Tue., 10/28 Grabowski & Venzke
« on: October 28, 2014, 09:30:13 AM »
THEME:   last word of a phrase can describe a MARK
   
GOOD ONES:     
"Remember what I said" {& theme}   MARK MY WORDS ["Mark me, mark me, O mark me" came to mind]   
Completed the course?   ATE ["Needs no question mark from hell tell us this!" --- probably from the same act in Hamlet]   
   
BTW:   
Chapter in a geology text, maybe   ERA [more likely eon in geology; era in history]   
   
Wonder what per cent of bingo players are on BEANO pills?    :)
   
   
RATING:    ;D
Three grins = Loved it; Two grins = Enjoyed it; One grin = A bit bland for my taste; One teardrop = Not much fun   

ktoonces

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Re: Tue., 10/28 Grabowski & Venzke
« Reply #1 on: October 28, 2014, 02:06:24 PM »
Actually, both words of a phrase can precede the word mark.

Thomps2525

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Re: Tue., 10/28 Grabowski & Venzke
« Reply #2 on: October 28, 2014, 05:19:08 PM »
Apparently Mister magus did not know that Bingo was originally called Beano. Well.....I have to admit that I didn't know that either. I found a detailed history of Bingo on a site called Strangelife. Beano was so named because when numbers were drawn, game players would use beans to cover the numbers on their cards.

http://www.strangelife.com/bingodoc/bingohist.html

I recently discovered that the New York Times crosswords appearing in the Los Angeles Daily News are not current. Each day's puzzle is a month old. I have no idea why the Daily News has a 30-day "lag." Anyway, the puzzle in today's paper included SLIPSLOP, clued with "Twaddle." Not only is "twaddle" pretty much archaic, "slipslop" is archaic. The Merriam-Webster Dictionary says the word dates from around 1675. It originally meant "watery food" and later "shallow talk or writing." The puzzle also includes UNSTOW, clued with "Take out of an overhead bin, say." "Unstow" is not in the dictionary and I don't see how it can even be a legitimate word. I don't think a person could "unstow" something any more than he could unstore, unhide, unplace, unput or unremove something. I insist that the word "unstow" is unfit to be in a crossword.

magus

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Re: Tue., 10/28 Grabowski & Venzke
« Reply #3 on: October 29, 2014, 09:30:25 AM »
tkoonces: Actually, both words of a phrase can precede the word mark.

Thanks, Anne.

Rewind: Apparently Mister magus did not know that Bingo was originally called Beano.

What did you read to make you think I didn't know? (I didn't, but that's besides the point   :)  )

 


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