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91
Today's Puzzles / Sun., 6/28 Jim Quinlan
« Last post by magus on June 28, 2015, 09:38:35 AM »
THEME:   missing letter from a Broadway play makes an odd phrase
   
GOOD ONES:    
Show about an unusual car?   THE ODD COUPE   
Show about shoeless Shem?   BAREFOOT IN THE ARK [Shem was with Noah on the ark]   
Start of a waste line?   HASTE [as in it makes waste --- not waistline]   
Hole in the head   NOSTRIL   
Sound often prohibited?   PEEP ["Don't make a peep!"]   
Sink hole   DRAIN   
Mustard weapon, possibly   ROPE [amazing how that games stays in one's memory!  Col. Mustard is from the game Clue and one weapon was a rope]   
Possessive type?   DEMON [as in demonic possession]   
First name in lexicography   NOAH [Webster's first name.  And Webster is also the first name in lexicography.]   
   
BTW:   
Foes of us   THEM [but to be grammatical, the phrase should be "It's they or us," but it sounds lame (lame sounds odd to me)]   
   
"Yo te ___": Spanish lover's words   AMO [perhaps Jim is a lover of Spanish, but as a speaker of English with its Latin roots, I'd go with "Latin lover's word" or the cigar brand Te ___]   
   
   
RATING:    ;D ;D ;D
Three grins = Loved it; Two grins = Enjoyed it; One grin = A bit bland for my taste; One teardrop = Not much fun   
92
Today's Puzzles / Sat., 6/27 Daniel Nierenberg
« Last post by magus on June 27, 2015, 09:04:57 AM »
THEME:   none
   
GOOD ONES:    
Drive on the way to Hollywood?   ACTING BUG [not a thoroughfare]   
One who's easy to take   SITTING DUCK [not tolerate]   
Hog support?   KICKSTAND [a Harley is called a Hog]   
High style   AFRO [always liked them, but they're so 70's]   
   
BTW:   
1978 Toyota debut   SUPRA [speaking of the 70's, I actually bought one and it was super --- and lasted]   
   
Sichuan native   PANDA BEAR [common usage, but it's incorrect]   
   
SABE not used in English. [kimo sabe works, so why go with a foreign term --- quien sabe?]   
   
   
RATING:    ;D ;D
Three grins = Loved it; Two grins = Enjoyed it; One grin = A bit bland for my taste; One teardrop = Not much fun   
93
Today's Puzzles / Fri., 6/26 Joseph Groat
« Last post by magus on June 26, 2015, 09:12:53 AM »
THEME:   A T is added to ordinary phrases
   
GOOD ONES:    
Facetious tribute for Hollywood's Stone?   ROAST OF SHARON [rose of sharon]   
   
BTW:   
More challenging than entertaining.   
   
   
RATING: ;D   
Three grins = Loved it; Two grins = Enjoyed it; One grin = A bit bland for my taste; One teardrop = Not much fun   
94
Today's Puzzles / Thu., 6/25 Venzke and Grabowski
« Last post by magus on June 25, 2015, 08:58:58 AM »
THEME:   last word of a phrase is an anagram of MEAT
   
GOOD ONES:     
Like much rock {& theme}   METAMORPHIC   
   
BTW:   
Casing filler   SAUSAGE MEAT [redundant --- particularly poor since it was a theme entry and a phrase upon which the entire puzzle is built]   
   
Ratt or Poison   BAND [I'm afraid I had stopped listening before these musical genii recorded]   
   
"Little Things Mean A LOT," however, is a fav from my youth.   
   
   
RATING:    :'(
Three grins = Loved it; Two grins = Enjoyed it; One grin = A bit bland for my taste; One teardrop = Not much fun   
95
Today's Puzzles / Wed., 6/24 Gareth Bain
« Last post by magus on June 24, 2015, 09:00:37 AM »
THEME:   last word of a phrase is a kind of party
   
GOOD ONES:    
Wayne's World catchphrase {& theme}   PARTY TIME   
Works in a museum  ART [the noun, not verb]   
Made a point of?   SHARPENED   
   
BTW:   
"Let me help"   WHAT CAN I DO [in a way, but awkward]   
   
Not doing one's job   DROPPING THE BALL [in a way, but awkward: are these clues designed to be tricky or clever?  I find them neither.]   
   
Afternoon ora   TRE [apparently mixing English and Italian as my mother did is acceptable]   
   
"HIP to be Square" has a clever lyric and a catchy arrangement (a bit jazz-like).   
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S-Pph3p6zww
   
   
RATING:    ;D
Three grins = Loved it; Two grins = Enjoyed it; One grin = A bit bland for my taste; One teardrop = Not much fun   
96
General Support / LATimes
« Last post by foodfanataholic on June 22, 2015, 03:28:02 AM »
LA Times link not working again
97
Today's Puzzles / Re: Sun., 6/21 C.C. Burnikel
« Last post by Thomps2525 on June 21, 2015, 05:53:57 PM »
I was pleasantly surprised to receive a prompt reply from Merl Reagle after I told him about the error in the reference to Howard Keel:

"hey, you're right. i read that it was 'leek' in ephraim katz's great film bio book the film encyclopedia, a book that newsweek once called 'the best movie reference book, hands-down.' it was so correct and authoritative on so many fronts that i never thought to doubt it. also, when it rains it pours -- 'hi lili' is from the leslie caron film lili (duh), not an american in paris. when my brain plays tricks on me, it goes all out."

It is obvious that Merl had used up his supply of capital letters for today's crossword and had none left for his e-mail. :)

 
98
Today's Puzzles / Re: Fri., 6/19 Jeffrey Wechsler
« Last post by Thomps2525 on June 21, 2015, 04:14:05 PM »
Sfachime as an epithet is variously translated as dick, scumbag, bastard, lowlife
or SOB. I suppose, to paraphrase a line from Alice In Wonderland, it can mean whatever we want it to mean.

http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=sfacim

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ea_mEpI6Ti8

http://www.beginningwithi.com/2006/11/06/italian-slang-s/

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/ken-bank/bob-grant-returns-to-wabc_b_65099.html (Fifth paragraph)
99
Today's Puzzles / Re: Sun., 6/21 C.C. Burnikel
« Last post by Thomps2525 on June 21, 2015, 03:27:15 PM »
Anyone who wishes to contact Merl Reagle can send an e-mail to  puzzwrks@merlmedia.com

To sign up for Reagle's mailing list and receive news about puzzles, books, conests and personal appearnces, simply enter your e-mail address at http://visitor.r20.constantcontact.com/manage/optin/ea?v=001ojzLQF2eJYF13WWRnDzTfNNf1awgBAN-DWFsBcVTZawANQUhehNAimrYfvSi4poKtZhxTVBPw8KgdVGDfahrWgQWIod9nvA-

That web address is a puzzle in itself! :)
100
Today's Puzzles / Re: Sun., 6/21 C.C. Burnikel
« Last post by Thomps2525 on June 21, 2015, 03:08:50 PM »
G, I would really love to discuss Merl Reagle's Sunday crossword. (See what I did there?) The title: "Hot Topic." The theme: CLIMATECHANGE. Each of the nine theme answers included seven shaded squares containing various combinations of the letters in CLIMATE. Among them are WITHOUTMALICE, DELICATEMATTER, MEALTICKETS, CHEMICHALTEST and the 1957 horror film FROMHELLITCAME.

"Actor-singer whose real name was Leek" was a reference to Howard KEEL but that is wrong. Howard Keel's real name was Harry Clifford Keel. The story that his real name was "Leek" was put forth by the MGM Studios publicity department in the 1950s. And yes, I'm writing Merl Reagle about the error.
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