User

Welcome, Guest.
Please login or register.
 
 
 
Forgot your password?

Navigate

Resources

Donations


You can help support this site by making a small donation using either a PayPal account:

or with a major credit card such as:

 

 

Click here for details.

Google Ads

Recent Posts

Pages: 1 ... 7 8 [9] 10
81
Today's Puzzles / Sun., 5/24 Mark Bickham
« Last post by magus on May 24, 2015, 09:42:00 AM »
THEME:   last letter(s) of a two-word phrase read with the first letters of the second word spell the name of a bird
   
GOOD ONES:    
Signs of spring {& theme}   NESTING BIRDS [they are nestled in the phrase]   
Canine coat?   ENAMEL [tooth]   
Couple maker   AND [I first had TWO]   
Base path?   EVIL [note two words]   
Downed with a jolt   TASED [I thought whiskey, etc.]   
Series ender   ET AL [not the World Series]   
Apple product   SEEDS [not I-Pod]   
   
BTW:   
Where texts are often read   CELL [even after I wrote the word I thought it meant prison cell not phone]   
   
"Be My Baby" singers   THE RONETTES [one of my favorite R&R songs --- group was named for lead singer Ronnie Spector, wife of arranger Phil Spector now in prison for murder]   https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2g_FD_sYazk    
   
Mark made a particularly good puzzle with (aside from the clever clues noted above) many unusual clues for ordinary words, a wide variety of subject matter, and a clever theme appropriate for the time of year.   
   
   
RATING: ;D ;D ;D   
Three grins = Loved it; Two grins = Enjoyed it; One grin = A bit bland for my taste; One teardrop = Not much fun   
82
Today's Puzzles / Re: Fri., 5/22 Jeffrey Wechsler
« Last post by rbe on May 23, 2015, 11:21:13 AM »
3. Do you have to pay the website for each word you use?   8)

 :)
83
Today's Puzzles / Re: Fri., 5/22 Jeffrey Wechsler
« Last post by magus on May 23, 2015, 11:02:07 AM »
rbe---

1. When I saw you had a comment, I said to myself he's probably found some mistake. ::)

2. Good editing, I omitted the E.   :-[

3. Do you have to pay the website for each word you use?   8)
84
Today's Puzzles / Sat., 5/23 Croce & Vratsanos
« Last post by magus on May 23, 2015, 10:55:35 AM »
THEME:   none, but two fifteeners
   
GOOD ONES:     
Over the limit on the rd.   DUI [alcohol, not speed]   
Liquidated?   MELTED [wasn't this in The Wizard of Oz?]   
Novel ending   ETTE [maybe not so novel but good nonetheless]
Short prayer?   MANTIS [that's "pray-er" so a praying mantis prays, in a way]   
Not a good way to run   AGROUND ["run aground" is a sailing horror about which I have direct experience!]   
Time keeper?   FOB [it keeps the watch from falling]   
   
BTW:   
Buff   FIEND [Hardly.  The clue means devotee; a FIEND is maniacal.  They are far apart]   
   
Right, in a way   AVENGE [only if one thinks that to take revenge is the right thing to do]   
   
Ejection interjection   SCRAM [but it's a command, not an interjection]   
   
"Building a healthier world" means the world and therefore its inhabitants are healthier.  The word "healthful" seems today to be ignored and so we get slogans like "… it's a healthy food" or "heathy choice."  But, I remember when "Winston tastes good like a cigarette should."  As Bob Dylan wrote, "I used to care, but things have changed."  [great song "Things Have Changed" and contrasts well with his earlier "Times, They Are A Changin'"]   
   
I don't mind being beaten, which I was today, but to lose to the French "___-la-loi" is hard to take [but to be honest, I couldn't get TOROID either]   
   
   
RATING:    ;D ;D
Three grins = Loved it; Two grins = Enjoyed it; One grin = A bit bland for my taste; One teardrop = Not much fun   
85
Today's Puzzles / Re: Fri., 5/22 Jeffrey Wechsler
« Last post by rbe on May 22, 2015, 08:09:24 PM »
COLLARED GREENS
86
Today's Puzzles / Fri., 5/22 Jeffrey Wechsler
« Last post by magus on May 22, 2015, 08:24:19 AM »
THEME:   homophones exchanged for first words of phrases changes meanings
   
GOOD ONES:    
Chorus of cows?   MOOED MUSIC   
Environmental priests?   COLLARD GREENS   
Assessed penalties against nonconformists?   FINED THE WAY OUT [they are "way out"]   
   
BTW:   
Cajuns'…ancestors, e.g.   EXILES [in the media there seems to have been a redefinition of such words: expats and emigrants are called migrants as if they are nomadic; hence, those fleeing from Syria to Italy and those crossing the Rio Grande are not exiles or emigrants but migrants simply wandering to to better fields --- like hummingbirds]

The Joy of Sex following yesterday's display of the unmentionable, indeed!   
   
   
RATING: ;D ;D ;D   
Three grins = Loved it; Two grins = Enjoyed it; One grin = A bit bland for my taste; One teardrop = Not much fun   
87
Today's Puzzles / Thu., 5/21 Peter A. Collins
« Last post by magus on May 21, 2015, 09:02:54 AM »
THEME:   ANTE spelled "upward" found in phrases Down
   
GOOD ONES:    
Poker request {& theme}   ANTE UP [loved this theme]   
Like some bands   ONE-MAN   
Honey and Boo Boo, e.g.   PET NAMES [not "Honey Boo Boo" of the net]   
Matthew Fox and Peter Coyote   ACTORS [not canines]   
   
BTW:   
"Cat got your tongue?"   SAY IT [the idiom is general while the fill is particular: I'd go with the pop song of the Big Band Era --- well, maybe too tough --- how about "Come out with"?]   
   
Square root of nove   TRE [integers are international but not words]   
   
Countess' husband   EARL [COUNT didn't fit]   
   
Crossing GET NAKED with TWERKING!  Well, I never…!   
   
RATING: ;D ;D   
Three grins = Loved it; Two grins = Enjoyed it; One grin = A bit bland for my taste; One teardrop = Not much fun   
88
Today's Puzzles / Re: Wed., 5/20 Michael Dewey
« Last post by Thomps2525 on May 20, 2015, 04:39:11 PM »
Merriam-Webster says the word "pratfall," meaning "a fall in which a person lands on his buttocks," dates from 1930. The word "prat," which means "buttocks," is an argot word dating from 1560-70. ("Argot" is a nice way of saying "We have no idea where the word comes from.") Around 1961, the word "prat" began to be used in Great Britain as another name for a stupid or obnoxious person. We need to enunciate clearly. Someone could easily mistake "Jack Sprat" for "Jack's prat." :)
89
Today's Puzzles / Wed., 5/20 Michael Dewey
« Last post by magus on May 20, 2015, 08:36:30 AM »
THEME:   last word of phrase can precede SHOT (in basketball)
   
GOOD ONES:    
Start to fall?   PRAT   
Revolutionary sewer   ROSS [the seamstress not the conduit]   
   
BTW:   
South, in Soissons   SUD [but not across the Channel]   
But had ECRU been changed the ECCE and TSPS to TSAR there would have been no need to use a French word really unused in English.   
   
RATING:    ;D
Three grins = Loved it; Two grins = Enjoyed it; One grin = A bit bland for my taste; One teardrop = Not much fun   
90
Today's Puzzles / The May 19 crossword is THE GREATEST
« Last post by Thomps2525 on May 19, 2015, 04:54:22 PM »
Among the answers in today's Daily News crossword by Bruce Haight: GEAR, GIRTHS, HEATH, STRESS, STREETS, TERESA, STARTERSET, THATSGREAT and EASTEREGGS. The center answer was EIGHT, which is the "total number of letters of the alphabet used in this puzzle": AEGHIRTS. I wonder if it is just coincidence that some of those eight letters can spell Bruce's last name.

I was not impressed with the theme answers in Marti DuGuay-Carpenter's Los Angeles Times crossword:

Bunch of valets? PARKINGLOT
Bunch of builders? ERECTORSET
Bunch of contortionists? ELASTICBAND
Bunch of cryptogolists? DECODERRING

Decoder rings were popular in the 1930s-40s-50s. They were offered as premiums to listeners of Little Orphan Annie, Captain Midnight and other radio and television programs. The typical ring had the letters of the alphabet arranged in a circle. An inner disc contained the 26 letters in a random order. The radio programs would give out a coded message and instruct ring holders to decode the message by turning the inner dial to a certain letter. For example, if the code was "G equals A," the inner ring would be rotated until the G lined up with the outer A. The coded message could then be deciphered. Often it was just a message from the program's sponsor, such as "Drink Ovaltine."

The Universal crossword contained some cringe-worthy tree-related puns:

Lazy trees? BEECHBUMS
Delivered tree? PIZZAPINE
Question for a Canadian tree? AREYOUOAKEH
What the paranoid tree-phobic person shouts? FIRGETMENOT

"Pizza pine"? Gak!

Today's NEA crossword: Typical. More of the usual over-used words, including ADE, ECRU, EDGE, EKE, ENID, ERE, ERIE, ESS, GNU, ODE, OGEE and OKRA...and QED, which was crossed with the French word QUOI.
Pages: 1 ... 7 8 [9] 10
Powered by EzPortal