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71
Today's Puzzles / Re: Wed., 3/4 Don Gagliardo
« Last post by rbe on March 05, 2015, 12:02:43 PM »
True, but it wasn't clued as a place name as was ___la Plata. I think the clue asked for the Italian word for island.
72
Today's Puzzles / Re: Wed., 3/4 Don Gagliardo
« Last post by magus on March 05, 2015, 09:08:50 AM »
rbe---

Isola is used in place names, so in my world they are okay.
73
Today's Puzzles / Thu., 3/5 C.C. Burnikel
« Last post by magus on March 05, 2015, 09:04:28 AM »
THEME:   chain stores
   
GOOD ONES:     
Mobile setting: Abbr.   ALA [the city not the switch]   
Gets into a seat   ELECTS   
Spare pieces?   RIBS [I thought RIMS]   
Price number   ARIA [Leontyne, the singer and if one considers an aria a number, which is usually a pop song]   
They catch busses at stadiums   KISS CAMS [busses is obs. for kisses]   
Took courses at midnight?   ATE LATE [wonder if there are night schools that run so late --- maybe on the web]   
   
BTW:   
Ryder Cup chant   USA USA ["there's no chanting in golf"]   
   
SHE'S A LADY is a bad memory both in sound and lyric.   
   
RATING: ;D ;D   
Three grins = Loved it; Two grins = Enjoyed it; One grin = A bit bland for my taste; One teardrop = Not much fun   
74
Today's Puzzles / Re: Wed., 3/4 Don Gagliardo
« Last post by LARadioRewind on March 04, 2015, 03:57:43 PM »
The answer for "Additions" was ANDS. I have heard the expression "No ifs, ands or buts" but I was not certain that "and" could properly be used as a noun. Apparently it can not. The Merriam-Webster dictionary does not give any definitions of "and" or "but" as a noun. However, "if" can be a noun meaning "a  stipulation or condition." I will be very unhappy if another puzzle maker uses "and" as a noun...and that's a pretty big if!
75
Today's Puzzles / Re: Wed., 3/4 Don Gagliardo
« Last post by LARadioRewind on March 04, 2015, 03:44:32 PM »
The answer for "Pulling ahead" is FURTHERAWAY. FURTHER originally meant "moreover; in addition; to a greater degree or extent" and FARTHER referred to distance. Because so many millions of people have used FURTHER when they meant FARTHER, such usage has now become acceptable. Dictionaries now say FURTHER is a synonym for FARTHER. I don't like that usage though, nor do I like NAUSEOUS as a synonym for NAUSEATED or COULD CARE LESS as a substitute for COULDN'T CARE LESS. Also, I question if FURTHERAHEAD implies "pulling away." If someone is further ahead---or farther ahead---he has already pulled away.

Today's crossword had eight individual black squares which were not connected to any other black squares, not even diagonally. It's nice to see puzzlemakers experimenting with different patterns. I wonder how easy it would be for someone to create a puzzle in which every black square is separate from the others---no blocks of two or three or four together but each black square unconnected to any others.
76
Today's Puzzles / Re: Wed., 3/4 Don Gagliardo
« Last post by rbe on March 04, 2015, 12:01:46 PM »
"ATOI and ETRE are not used in English --- only Xwords".

Add ISOLA to that list.
77
Today's Puzzles / Wed., 3/4 Don Gagliardo
« Last post by magus on March 04, 2015, 09:06:08 AM »
THEME:   RAH hidden in phrases
   
GOOD ONES:     
Stadium supporters {& their cry}   CHEERING SECTION [almost missed the three letters common to the three phrases]   
London home of Constables and Sargents   TATE [note caps and spelling]   
Metalworking union   WELD   
State secrets?   SNITCH   
   
BTW:   
Seeking lodging   LOOKING FOR A HOME [really?  When was the last time lodging was used to mean anything other than hotel accommodations?]   
   
Global financial org.   IMF [it's always going to be the Impossible Mission File to me, just as "William Tell Overture" is the Lone Ranger: child of the Fifties]    
   
Purring snuggler  LAPCAT [maybe it's a word in the feline world, but I'm not buying it]   
   
ATOI and ETRE are not used in English --- only Xwords.   
   
   
RATING: ;D ;D   
Three grins = Loved it; Two grins = Enjoyed it; One grin = A bit bland for my taste; One teardrop = Not much fun   
78
Today's Puzzles / Re: Tue., 3/3 Mike Buckley
« Last post by LARadioRewind on March 03, 2015, 04:58:29 PM »
Yesterday I mentioned a 1940 Mickey Mouse comic strip in which Mickey answered a quiz question asking where the emu is found: "In crossword puzzles." EMU is indeed one of the ten most common words appearing in crosswords, and that was true at least as far back as 1940. So what do I see in today's crossword? EMU. *Sigh* I also see three other overused words, ELK, LEI and SIT, along with IIII ("Four, on some sundials"). As for IIII, all I can say is "Ai-yi-yi-yi!"
79
Today's Puzzles / Re: Mon., 3/2 Roland Huget
« Last post by LARadioRewind on March 03, 2015, 04:52:08 PM »
...and what overused word did I find in the March 3 puzzle? That's right---EMU. *Sigh*
80
Today's Puzzles / Re: Tue., 3/3 Mike Buckley
« Last post by LARadioRewind on March 03, 2015, 04:48:46 PM »
YREKA was the answer to "Town in northern California that once had a palindromic bakery." Yes, there really was a Yreka Bakery. I have a copy of California Place Names, a 1969 book by Erwin G. Gudde---no relation to "Johnny B. Goode"---and he notes that when Siskiyou County was established in 1852, the one-year-old town of Shasta Butte City became the county seat and was renamed Yreka (pronounced "Y-reeka") after Wy-e-kah, the Shasta Indians' name for Mount Shasta ("north mountain"). I don't understand how Wy-e-kah could become Yreka, though. Farther south, the town of Eureka had been established in 1850. Perhaps the name of Yreka was meant to mimic Eureka.

Mark Twain wrote a story about Bret Harte seeing an upside down canvas sign that said BAKERY. With the B covered up, the sign said YREKA. Thanks to that story, many people have mistakenly believed that the town of Yreka was named after a bakery. People can be so gullible. Darn you, Mark Twain! The old Yreka Bakery is referenced on a page of palindromes:

http://jeff560.tripod.com/words5.html
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