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71
Today's Puzzles / Re: Sun., 12/6 Gail Grabowski
« Last post by Thomps2525 on December 06, 2015, 04:29:27 PM »
To most Americans, the words litre and centre probably seem odd.....although we don't seem to object to theater being spelled as theatre. Actually, it is our own spelling of "liter" which is odd. This is from Grammarist.com:

"Liter is the preferred spelling in American English and litre is preferred in all other main varieties of English. The word is much less common in American English than elsewhere because Americans generally use U.S. customary units rather than the metric system which other English-speaking countries use. In American English, liter comes up mostly in reference to beverages (for some reason) and foreign cars."

http://grammarist.com/spelling/liter-litre/

In our next lesson, we'll discuss "kerb" and "gaol."
72
Today's Puzzles / Re: Sat, 12/5 Barry C. Silk
« Last post by magus on December 06, 2015, 09:56:32 AM »
"Ah so" is a cute way of saying one understands; thus, "Understanding words" seems apt.  First time I heard it was in a Charlie Chan movie.  The last time was in some classroom full of effete posers into which I sadly found myself.
73
Today's Puzzles / Sun., 12/6 Gail Grabowski
« Last post by magus on December 06, 2015, 09:49:31 AM »
THEME:   letter reversals in phrases change their meanings
   
GOOD ONES:     
Where mixologists learn the ropes?   TRAINING BAR [bra]   
Complaint department?   CRAB COUNTER [carb]   
Traffic stoppers?   NARC [narcotic traffic]   
Tweeting source  NEST [I thought some computer communication I know nothing about]   
Made judgments on diamonds   UMPED [baseball, not jewels]   
Short lines at the register?  UPC [bar codes on packages]   
Round fig.   CIRC [not est.]   
Bath quantity?   LITRE [works both as an English measure in general or a means of measuring bath water]   
Mower handle?   DEERE [the name not the mower part, but handle is so last century!]   
Romantic evening switch   DIMMER [phew!]   
Shot contents   DOSE [I thought liquor but don’t know why as I don't drink the stuff]   
It may be dry or sparkling   WIT [I thought wines which I do drink]   
   
BTW:   
Split-resistant lumber   TEAK [perhaps that's why it's so costly]   
   
Rouen relative   ONCLE [I'd go with the film "Mon ___"]   
   
   
RATING:    ;D ;D ;D
Three grins = Loved it; Two grins = Enjoyed it; One grin = A bit bland for my taste; One teardrop = Not much fun   
74
Today's Puzzles / Re: Sat, 12/5 Barry C. Silk
« Last post by Thomps2525 on December 05, 2015, 07:51:31 PM »
Barry Silk included the names of Lawrence WELK, THOMASPAINE, JAMESKPOLK, ballerina SVETLANA Zakharova, Munsters co-star ALLEWIS and Exodus co-star Sal MINEO. He clued AHSO with "Understanding words." Really? I think "Ah so" is a facetious expression and does not necessarily convey understanding.
75
Today's Puzzles / Sat, 12/5 Barry C. Silk
« Last post by magus on December 05, 2015, 08:51:53 AM »
THEME:   none, 29 blocks
   
GOOD ONES:     
Night calls   HOOTS [owls, not telephones]   
Assistance trio?   ESSES [spelling]   
Team characteristic? SILENT A [spelling]   
   
   
RATING:    ;D
Three grins = Loved it; Two grins = Enjoyed it; One grin = A bit bland for my taste; One teardrop = Not much fun   
76
Today's Puzzles / Re: Fri., 12/4 Craig Stowe
« Last post by Thomps2525 on December 04, 2015, 02:08:11 PM »
Today's crossword has a cute theme but the word "kittycorner" really has nothing to do with cats. The Grammarist.com website explains that "Catty-corner, kitty-corner and cater-cornered all derive from the Middle English catre-corner, literally meaning four-cornered. All three forms are used throughout the English-speaking world. They usually mean positioned diagonally across a four-way intersection but they can work in other contexts relating to one thing being diagonal from another. Most dictionaries recommend cater-cornered but kitty-corner and catty-corner are more common in actual usage. The past-participial forms—i.e., kitty-cornered and catty-cornered—might be more grammatically correct but the uninflected forms are more common."

http://grammarist.com/usage/catty-corner-kitty-corner/
77
Today's Puzzles / Re: Thu., 12/3 Gagliardo & Burnikel
« Last post by magus on December 04, 2015, 10:17:42 AM »
Your fellow passengers won't know what you're talking about and will likely think you are trying too hard to impress them with your nautical acumen.  So Yare!  [wasn't that a Jimmy Dorsey song?]
78
Today's Puzzles / Fri., 12/4 Craig Stowe
« Last post by magus on December 04, 2015, 10:08:36 AM »
THEME:   the corners of the grid have the names of fictional cats
   
GOOD ONES:
     
Diagonal {& theme}   KITTYCORNER   
Leftovers   OTHERS   

   
BTW:   
"Yoo-Hoo"   HERE I AM [possible, but mostly it's "Hello there" or "Hey"]   
   
Pebby Lee specialty   TORCH SONG [they were sad love songs named from the expression "burning a torch for" meaning mourning a loss of a lover]   
   
   
Pulls a Charmin shenanigan, briefly   TPS [TPS=toilet papers, meaning to deface property with toilet paper, a brand of which is Charmin]   

   
RATING:    ;D
Three grins = Loved it; Two grins = Enjoyed it; One grin = A bit bland for my taste; One teardrop = Not much fun   
79
Today's Puzzles / Re: Thu., 12/3 Gagliardo & Burnikel
« Last post by Thomps2525 on December 03, 2015, 04:16:57 PM »
Allow me to be the first to wish you all a Happy New Yare. (Sorry, I just can't resist making bad puns.)

Merriam-Webster defines "yare" as "1.quick; agile; lively. 2. (of a ship) quick to the helm; easily handled or maneuvered. 3. Archaic ready; prepared."

Dictionary.com gives this origin of the word: "Before 900; Middle English; Old English gearu, gearo, equivalent to earu 'ready'; cognate with Dutch gaar, German gar 'done.'"

It isn't often that I learn a new word from a crossword puzzle. I'm well acquainted with EMU, ERA, IRE, LEI, OBOE, ORE, OREO, SPA and other overused words and thus it was nice to see YARE today. The next time I'm on a boat, I'll have to find a way to use the word and impress my fellow passengers.

Or maybe I could use my "Happy New Yare" pun.
80
Today's Puzzles / Re: Thu., 12/3 Gagliardo & Burnikel
« Last post by Filer on December 03, 2015, 12:22:59 PM »
YARE! Twenty-three years as a Naval Officer; one-third of the time at sea and never heard the word.
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