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71
Today's Puzzles / Fr., 8/1 Julian Lim
« Last post by magus on August 01, 2014, 09:16:45 AM »
THEME:   common phrases interpreted from an airline's point of view
   
GOOD ONES:     
Mark showing the status of a stormy-day flight?   CANCELED CHECK      
Pitcher?   AD REP   
Routine elements   JOKES   
Sees the sights   SURFS   
Exchange notes   PAY CASH   
Well-manored?   EARL [an earl may live in a manor]   
   
BTW:   
"Stop kidding around!"   OH YOU [The exclamation point suggests anger while OH YOU suggests mild exasperation.  "Such a tease!" would work.]    
   
OOKY, indeed!   
   
   
RATING:    ;D ;D
Three grins = Loved it; Two grins = Enjoyed it; One grin = A bit bland for my taste; One teardrop = Not much fun   
72
Today's Puzzles / Thu., 7/31 Steve Blais
« Last post by magus on July 31, 2014, 09:08:20 AM »
THEME:   first word of a phrase is an anagram of SABER
   
GOOD ONES:     
Threat of power {& theme}   SABER RATTLING   
What may make the future tense?  OMEN   
River ends?   ARS [that's R's spelled out]   
Code carrier   GENE [is that Gene the spy?]    :)
Court cover-up   ROBE [never thought of it that way --- just what are they covering?]   
Caught at the theater   SAW [not Dillinger]   
Amount past due?   TRE   
   
BTW:   
Beethoven honoree   ELISE [she was his student and the piece was for her to study]   
   
RATING: ;D ;D ;D   
Three grins = Loved it; Two grins = Enjoyed it; One grin = A bit bland for my taste; One teardrop = Not much fun   
73
Today's Puzzles / Re: Tue., 7/29 Pawel Fludzinski
« Last post by wbg on July 30, 2014, 10:26:38 AM »
Sorry, didn't know wrong was noted in brown.  I don't think I've ever seen it in an original, current usage, just in excerpts from old documents.
74
Today's Puzzles / Wed., 7/30 Gareth Bain
« Last post by magus on July 30, 2014, 08:56:53 AM »
THEME:   last word of a phrase can mean "I give up"
   
GOOD ONES:    
Waved banner {& theme}   WHITE FLAG   
Shakers, but not movers   SECT [religion]   
   
BTW:   
Oranges opposite?   APPLES [Never understood what was wrong with "mixing oranges and apples" since they are closely allied and certainly the stuff of analogy.  I'd prefer "mixing elephants and pebbles" to show how poor a comparison is.   
   
TREF is not kosher  8)  and not in my dictionaries.  LaRadioRewind and WBG, is this one for your lists?   
   
   
RATING: ;D   
Three grins = Loved it; Two grins = Enjoyed it; One grin = A bit bland for my taste; One teardrop = Not much fun   
75
Today's Puzzles / Re: Tue., 7/29 Pawel Fludzinski
« Last post by magus on July 30, 2014, 08:44:42 AM »
WBG---

Thanks for the help, but I didn't say it was unfair or incorrect (not in brown), and I had the period to show it was an abbreviation.  I just thought it outre.  I mean, when was the last time you saw it?
76
General Discussion / What's the problem with stepquotes?
« Last post by wbg on July 29, 2014, 09:54:35 PM »
Stepquotes were popular a number of years ago, but it seems that they have fallen badly out of fashion among editors.  Does anyone know why this is?  And quote puzzles in general.

One needs a really good quote, but if that requirement is met, what's the problem?  A nice feature (for me, at least) is that you need to get a fair amount of the rest of the puzzle solved before you can begin to make anything of the quote.

One of my favorites, from some years back, was a quote attributed to Henry Kissinger (as I recall):

"Ninety percent of the politicians give the other ten percent a bad name."

Bill
77
Today's Puzzles / Re: Mon., 7/28 Nichols & Burnikel
« Last post by wbg on July 29, 2014, 09:42:42 AM »
Rewind, my personal favorites are ETUI and ADIT, which I have never once seen or heard except in a crossword. (Amusing, though, to think of a drug user saying to his friend "Jake, have you seen my etui?")  What really bugs me, though, is sticking "RE" in front of any old verb, even if it is not actually used.  RELED appeared recently somewhere, clued with "took the reins again" or something like that.  Filling a grid can be hard, but it seems to me that this really should be avoided.

Bill
78
Today's Puzzles / Re: Tue., 7/29 Pawel Fludzinski
« Last post by wbg on July 29, 2014, 09:20:06 AM »
JAS was used as an abbreviation for James in the old days, around the time those guys were active.  Fair clue.
79
Today's Puzzles / Tue., 7/29 Pawel Fludzinski
« Last post by magus on July 29, 2014, 09:07:39 AM »
THEME:   words and phrases containing 4 A's
   
GOOD ONES:     
Battery {& theme}   AAAA [didn't know about these guys]   
Missed the bus, forgot lunch, argued with the boss, etc.   HAD A BAD DAY [enjoyed the length and related]   
Napkin holder   LAP   
   
BTW:   
Madison or Monroe, for short   JAS [I had JIM and I'm right!  What this Jas. jazz?]   >:(   
   
Busybody   YENTA [Only among Jews is the Yiddish term possibly to be heard, and since we have a term in English, it seems superfluous.  I like spritz and shhmooze but not ganef.]   
   
   
RATING:  ;D   
Three grins = Loved it; Two grins = Enjoyed it; One grin = A bit bland for my taste; One teardrop = Not much fun   
80
Today's Puzzles / Re: Mon., 7/28 Nichols & Burnikel
« Last post by LARadioRewind on July 28, 2014, 05:40:41 PM »
There are a few hundred short words, mostly of three or four letters, that are very common in puzzles. Collectively they are known as "Crosswordese." (I could have called them "Arthur" but I didn't want to steal a gag from the Hard Day's Night movie.) Among the words that appear in several puzles every week are LEI, ALOHA, ESE, OTT, SRTA and ELLA. Subscribing to the Times, Register and Daily News gives me a lot of puzzles to work...but I get dismayed at seeing the same words in several puzzles a week, although I enjoy seeing how many different clues the editors can come up with for the same word. When "LEI" is in three puzzles every week, they can't make it obvious by using the same clue each time. Today's Times puzzle may have set a record for the greatest amount of Crosswordese in a single puzzle: ETA, ETTU, EERO, BLT, BAD, ADO, REO, CHAI, LULU, INCA, NCAA, ASP, OAR, YES, TAI, TLC, ZITI, ELATE, OREO, LASER and TASER. I'd love to see some puzzles with more originality!

Magus, maybe most of us stand pat and it's only the lazy people who sit pat. :)
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