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71
General Discussion / Test Solvers Needed
« Last post by mrdrawerguy on September 30, 2014, 09:28:17 AM »
I am at adamnicolle.com and I don't have a test solver for my puzzles yet. This test solver has to be really good at solving puzzles and will be able to reply back within 24 hours with feedback.

If anyone is interested, e-mail mrcrafterguy@hotmail.com with the headline "Test Solver" and I will send you a sample puzzle for you to give feedback to.

Thank you.
72
Today's Puzzles / Tue., 9/30 Steve Blais
« Last post by magus on September 30, 2014, 08:51:55 AM »
THEME:   first word of a phrase is something that can be lost
   
GOOD ONES:    
What risk takers have {& theme}   SOMETHING TO LOSE [like the time it took to do this puzzle]     :)
It's a gas in Canada   ESSO ["it's a gas" has escaped our idiom]   
Stand-up individual?   COMIC   
First lady?   EVE [oldie but goodie]   
   
BTW:   
Rear end   TUSH [really only a Yiddish expression used sometimes in NY, LA, and Miami --- same with couli --- I don't like either as we have butt or ass, if the occasion calls for it]   
   
   
   
RATING:    :'(
Three grins = Loved it; Two grins = Enjoyed it; One grin = A bit bland for my taste; One teardrop = Not much fun   
73
Today's Puzzles / Re: Mon., 9/29 Matt Skoczen
« Last post by LARadioRewind on September 29, 2014, 05:18:39 PM »
May I take part in this "wrap" session? Today's puzzle had a cute theme but there were far too many foreign words and brand names. Crossword editors used to reject such puzzles. Today's answers included DRANG, ETTU, HERR and OTRA, along with FANTA, IMAC, INTEL, QTIP and SOBE. But none of those words bothered me as much as EARWAX, which is disgusting as a physical condition and disgusting as a puizzle answer.

Today's New York Times crossword had three foreign words, ALTA, ESA and ETTU. Yes, another ETTU. Julius Caesar will never be forgotten. This puzzle had only one brand name, though: PABST.

I'm sure that the manufacturers of Fanta, Pabst, Sobe, iMacs and Q-Tips appreciate all this free advertising!
74
Today's Puzzles / Mon., 9/29 Matt Skoczen
« Last post by magus on September 29, 2014, 08:38:48 AM »
THEME:   first word of a phrase can precede WRAP
   
GOOD ONES:    
Director's "We're done" {& theme}   THAT'S A WRAP [personally, I don't give a wrap!]  :)    
Ward of "CSI: NY"   SELA [not a ward or section of the city]   
   
BTW:   
Mexican's "other"  OTRA [correct, but this isn't Mexico --- thank goodness]   
   
   
RATING: :'(   
Three grins = Loved it; Two grins = Enjoyed it; One grin = A bit bland for my taste; One teardrop = Not much fun   
75
General Discussion / Re: Need puzzles to publish for a new gardening publication
« Last post by mmcbs on September 28, 2014, 10:03:13 PM »
Rochelle, I'd like to thank you for the opportunity to provide the puzzle for your fall issue, and I'm very pleased that it worked out for you. Perhaps others reading this forum will try also.
76
General Discussion / Re: Unfillable Grid
« Last post by mmcbs on September 28, 2014, 10:01:07 PM »
In CC, if you're trying to fill around theme entries, you can eyeball places that look suspicious (like, you can't think of something in your head that would fit), then right click on that word to see if your wordlist has ANY suggestions. If there are none, that's a spot that needs to be fixed by rearranging theme entries, moving or adding blanks, or trying a different grid. It doesn't tell you specifically where problem(s) are.
77
Today's Puzzles / Re: Sun., 9/28 Dana Olsen
« Last post by LARadioRewind on September 28, 2014, 07:09:20 PM »
In the September 13 Los Angeles Times puzzle, SST was clued with "Former Mach 2 flier, briefly." SST appeared again in the September 16 puzzle, clued with "Bygone boomer." Today's New York Times crossword includes SST and the clue is "Orly bird, once." The reference is to the Paris airport, AĆ©roport de Paris-Orly. I wonder how many different clues for SST the puzzle makers can come up with. Or for IRE. Or ALE. Or SPA. Or LEI. Or ALOHA. Or.....
78
Today's Puzzles / Re: Sun., 9/28 Dana Olsen
« Last post by LARadioRewind on September 28, 2014, 03:41:31 PM »
"September Story" is the title of Merl Reagle's puzzle in today's Los Angeles Times/ He explains that September was the seventh month (sept- = seven) of the old Roman calendar which had ten months. When two months were added, September became the ninth month. The puzzle includes several phrases containing SEVEN or NINE. Examples: CANINETEETH, THISEVENING and GETSEVENWITH. Two answers share a clue: "What 'September' has." The answers are NINELETTERS and SEVENDIFFERENTLETTERS. Reagle really put some effort into this one!

"What, Steve? No criticisms?" Well.....the puzzle does include an overabundance of foreign words: ACH, CASA, COSA, ELEVE, HERR, OLE, SEIS, SRTA, the Roman numerals III and the Greek letter PSI. On the other hand, Reagle used five very uncommon words: BANZAI, NATTINESS, PAGINATE, RIPARIAN and TRANQUILIZE. Overall, a very impressive puzzle!
79
General Support / Honeycomb grid
« Last post by garyk on September 28, 2014, 11:32:19 AM »
I'm looking for advice from someone who has constructed a puzzle with a honeycomb grid, in which the cells are hexagons and the entries run in three directions. I have some experience with ordinary square grids, but here I'm at a loss. Since I need valid entries going three different ways, it seems I should be generous in sprinkling black cells. I also hope to fit in a few theme entries. This is intended as a gift rather than for publication.
80
Today's Puzzles / Sun., 9/28 Dana Olsen
« Last post by magus on September 28, 2014, 09:13:48 AM »
THEME:   common phrases clued partially with "me"
   
GOOD ONES:    
Title: Ah, Me!   
Is for you?   ARE [oldie but goodie]   
   
BTW:   
Condiment for pommes frites   SEL [I guess in French restaurants we see SEL, but I'd go with the Mercedes model]   
   
Bad news from home   YER OUT [would've been good, but it's "at home" in baseball]   
   
Beth preceder   ALEPH [don't know why letters in Hebrew are in the dictionary, but it's fittingly crossed by EL AL]   
   
Enjoyed a friend's mom's cooking   ATE OVER [this is substandard English]   
   
Former Disney exec   EISNER ["and virtual destroyer of the brand" should have been added]     
   
RATING:    ;D
Three grins = Loved it; Two grins = Enjoyed it; One grin = A bit bland for my taste; One teardrop = Not much fun   
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