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51
Today's Puzzles / Sun., 7/12 Levin & Venzke
« Last post by magus on July 12, 2015, 09:07:53 AM »
THEME:   the sound of a phrase when a -TH ending is added changes the meaning of the original phrase
   
GOOD ONES:     
couldn't find any    but I found 4 Z's
   
BTW:   
The title "Th-, Th-, That's All Folks" suggests the stuttering of Porky Pig, yet the theme answers are simply phrases to which a "TH" is appended meaning that it's the digraph TH which is germain.  Thus, Chairman Mao becomes CHAIRMAN MOUTH, which would have been good if the clue "Unflattering nickname for a boastful corporate bigwig?" were less wordy.  "Loud boss?" would work.   
   
Guffaw   YUK [a "guffaw" is loud; a YUK is often a disparaging term for, or a false, laugh or titter]   
   
More experienced  WISER [would that were so --- wisdom is not reserved for the elderly, so many of whom are unwise]   
   
Ashton's partner   MYLA [I assume these are stars (I know Aston Kutcher), and if they are lovers why do we not call them so: partners sounds like a business arrangement.  Even worse is "sleeping with" as a euphemism for "having sexual relations with" or the Anglo-Saxon term which I much prefer, but which vestiges of our Victorian heritage forbid in "polite" company.]   
   
Spanish "these"  ESTOS [exactly]   
   
RATING:     :'(
Three grins = Loved it; Two grins = Enjoyed it; One grin = A bit bland for my taste; One teardrop = Not much fun   
52
Today's Puzzles / Re: Thu., 7/9 Jerry Edelstein
« Last post by Thomps2525 on July 11, 2015, 04:09:56 PM »
Here are three similar definitions of "deserted":

Cambridge Dictionary : "Having no people or things in it; empty."
Macmillan Dictionary: "Empty of people or things: empty, blank, bare."
Oxford Dictionary: "(Of a place) empty of people."

So "deserted" means "having no people" but I still don't see how an island can be legitimately referred to as "deserted" if there were never any inhabitants to desert it. I'm going to side with the lexicographers who share that same opinion. There have never been people living on Mars or Venus. Would we describe those planets as "deserted"? Maybe some would...but I wouldn't.

I'm reminded of a Sunday Peanuts comic in which Lucy, Schroeder, Patty, Violet, Shermy and Snoopy were standing on the pitcher's mound with Charlie Brown. A question about how to pitch to a batter turned into a lively debate on several unrelated subjects. Charlie Brown sighed, "We never win any ball games but we certainly have some interesting discussions."

I can relate! :)

53
Today's Puzzles / Re: Sat., 7/11 Barry C. Silk
« Last post by Thomps2525 on July 11, 2015, 03:53:10 PM »
The French word égale is a noun meaning "equal." The adjectival form of the word is égal, which can also mean "even; level" when referring to a surface. A useful phrase to know is Ça m'est égal. It means "I don't care." :)

The lyrics of In The Summertime are pretty tame compared to the sex-and-violence themes of so many 1990s-2000s rap songs. Here is a sample:

"When the weather's fine
You got women, you got women on your mind
Have a drink, have a drive
Go out and see what you can find...
When the winter's here, yeah, it's party time
Bring your bottle, wear your bright clothes..."

Yes, fairly tame.....although the admonition to drink and drive certainly didn't show any wisdom!








54
Today's Puzzles / Re: Sat., 7/11 Barry C. Silk
« Last post by rbe on July 11, 2015, 11:31:43 AM »
EDAMAME
Couldn't resist.  ;)
55
Today's Puzzles / Re: Thu., 7/9 Jerry Edelstein
« Last post by magus on July 11, 2015, 09:15:36 AM »
25(2):

I meant in my reply to say deserted not uninhabited.  Sorry.

As for your jury summation:
It can't be deserted unless people were living on it at one time and then left.

I agree that uninhabited denotes "not occupied" but so does deserted.  A "deserted island" means that no one occupies it, whether or not it had once been occupied.  If you don't believe me, and you should, you can go to the Oxford.  Admittedly, there is some disagreement among lexicographers, but whether or not one admits to a denotative authority, certainly connotatively an island can be deserted without having had any previous inhabitants.
56
Today's Puzzles / Sat., 7/11 Barry C. Silk
« Last post by magus on July 11, 2015, 08:53:06 AM »
THEME:   none, but only 26 blocks
   
GOOD ONES:     
Head makeup   SUDS [as in beer not powder, etc.]   
Throw in a pen   WARM UP [as in baseball, not prison or farm enclosure]   
Bears, often   SELLERS [stock traders, not animals or football players]   
   
BTW:   
Half of sei   TRE [in Rome, not here]   
   
The same in Sauternes   EGALE [not even sure if it's true in France: isn't it egal]   
   
"In the Summertime" by Mungo Jerry is not only a terrible sounding song; it's lyrics are sexist and classist.  Thanks for the memory, Barry.  And thanks for crossing EDAHAME with LENA (as some river and not the singer) at the E!   
   
   
RATING:    ;D ;D
Three grins = Loved it; Two grins = Enjoyed it; One grin = A bit bland for my taste; One teardrop = Not much fun   
57
Today's Puzzles / Re: Thu., 7/9 Jerry Edelstein
« Last post by Thomps2525 on July 10, 2015, 03:57:11 PM »
Okay, let me summarize this for the members of the jury:

If an island never had any people living on it, it is not "deserted." It is "uninhabited." It can't be deserted unless people were living on it at one time and then left.

If shipwreck survivors reach an uninhabited island, it is no longer uninhabited---although I would prefer the word "occupied" because "inhabited" implies that the people have made the island their permanent residence.

Finally, there was no logical reason for Mr. and Mrs. Howell to take several clothes-filled suitcases on what was supposed to be a "three-hour tour."
58
General Discussion / Wall Street Journal
« Last post by sfried on July 10, 2015, 11:17:10 AM »
Unable to open the Friday WSJ puzzle for past two weeks.
59
Today's Puzzles / Re: TB or not TB: The July 6 crosswords
« Last post by magus on July 10, 2015, 08:50:48 AM »
Much better than Zager & Evans.  Maybe I'd change "common" to "tired."
60
Today's Puzzles / Re: Thu., 7/9 Jerry Edelstein
« Last post by magus on July 10, 2015, 08:48:26 AM »
Of course an island cannot be uninhabited if a shipwreck survivor lives on it, but there's a Shakespearean quote I can't remember "precisely" which goes something like "It is brainsickly to think too precisely on things."  Not to say you have a sick brain, but it certainly is literal.
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