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51
Today's Puzzles / Re: Mon., 3/9 Carol Hacker
« Last post by magus on March 10, 2015, 09:40:15 AM »
Our reading and writing vocabularies are far greater from our speaking vocabulary, so it's not unusual to read quaff but not hear it spoken. 
52
Today's Puzzles / Tue., 3/10 John Lampkin
« Last post by magus on March 10, 2015, 09:34:56 AM »
THEME:   Things William Tell   
      
GOOD ONES:        
Review of books?   AUDIT      
      
BTW:      
Nice NELLY is new to me perhaps because I'm from the East, as appropriate for a Magus.      
      
Elton John's title   SIR [better without the apostrophe so it could also be a three-letter song title]      
      
RATING:  :'(      
Three grins = Loved it; Two grins = Enjoyed it; One grin = A bit bland for my taste; One teardrop = Not much fun      
53
Today's Puzzles / Re: Mon., 3/9 Carol Hacker
« Last post by LARadioRewind on March 09, 2015, 04:28:25 PM »
For the clue for MALO, Hacker could have said "Suavecito band, 1972." Then the answer would have been the name of a Latin-rock group from San Francisco instead of a Spanish word...although the band's name is the Spanish word.

"Christmas quaff" was NOG. I've seen NOG in quite a few puzzles but I have never heard anyone refer to the beverage as simply "nog" instead of "egg nog." Come to think of it, I've never heard anyone use the word "quaff" either!
54
Today's Puzzles / Re: Sun., 3/8 Ed Sessa
« Last post by LARadioRewind on March 09, 2015, 04:22:32 PM »
The Daily News runs the New York Times crossword puzzles...but the Monday-to-Friday puzzles appear four weeks after they're published in the Times and each Sunday puzzle appears one week after the Times runs it. The delay doesn't bother me except when a particular puzzle has a theme that relates to a holiday or a historical event for a certain date. For example, a 4th-of-July-themed puzzle makes little sense when it's printed in August.

The puzzle that ran on March 9 should have run on March 2. It did run on March 2 in the New York Times. The title was "Noted Anniversary." March 2 marked the 50th anniversary of THESOUNDOFMUSIC, which was the theme. "Noted"---get it? Other theme answers were JULIEANDREWS, SOUTHERNAUSTRIA, THEVONTRAPPS, THEHILLSAREALIVE, RODGERSANDHAMMERSTEIN and BESTPICTUREOSCAR. I will write the Daily News editor and ask why the crosswords are published belatedly.
55
Today's Puzzles / Mon., 3/9 Carol Hacker
« Last post by magus on March 09, 2015, 09:24:58 AM »
THEME:   last word of phrase means incline
   
GOOD ONES:     
none   
   
BTW:   
Margarita condiment…   SAL [what's wrong with "My Gal ___" or "___ the Barber Maglie" or "___ Mineo" or "Dali, to his friends?"  --- instead we get a Spanish word not used in our language]   
   
Bueno's opposite   MALO [if I remember Spanish class, MALO means evil, not bad in the sense of a kind of headache or enchilada; so it's opposite would be good in a moral sense --- in any event, it's not English]   
   
   
RATING:    :'(
Three grins = Loved it; Two grins = Enjoyed it; One grin = A bit bland for my taste; One teardrop = Not much fun   
56
Today's Puzzles / Re: Sun., 3/8 Ed Sessa
« Last post by LARadioRewind on March 08, 2015, 04:27:53 PM »
IZOD is a sled-dog race. No, wait, I'm thinking of Iditarod. IZOD is a sportswear company based in New York City.

The Los Angeles Times Sunday crossword appears in dozens of newspapers...but the Los Angeles Times is not one of them. Go figure! On Sunday, the Times runs Merl Reagle's crossword. Today's is titled "The Sides Of March." There is a saying that "March comes in like a lion and goes out like a lamb." Each theme answer contains LION or LAMB. Examples: DANDELION, PIKAPPALAMBDA, BLACKSTALLION, FEELAMBIVALENT and GOODWILLAMBASSADOR. The puzzle also includes EKE, ELI, ERR, IRA, LAD, OKRA, OLIO and several other words that are used far too often, plus the French word SOIR and another set of Roman numerals. *Sigh* At least the crossword had a clever theme.

57
Today's Puzzles / Re: Sun., 3/8 Ed Sessa
« Last post by rbe on March 08, 2015, 12:26:36 PM »
IZOD?
58
Today's Puzzles / Re: Sat., 3/7 Daniel Nierenberg
« Last post by magus on March 08, 2015, 10:01:48 AM »
Oddly, no scoring yields a score.
59
Today's Puzzles / Sun., 3/8 Ed Sessa
« Last post by magus on March 08, 2015, 09:59:14 AM »
THEME:   GEO found in random phrases
   
GOOD ONES:    
Hide-and seek with GPS {& theme}    GEO CACHING   
IMO, in Hamlet   METHINKS   
Central opening?   CEE   
   
BTW:   
This puzzle was particularly diverse in subject matter: from Hamlet to ONO; from RONEE to ABEL; J AND J to IZOD; and even MOJOS to DODOZ.   
   
Of no consequence   MOOT [actually MOOT means debatable, but through misuse…]   
   
Swipe from   ROB [actually ROB means to take from a person; swipe means simply to steal.  But through misuse…]   
   
DUDES for Bros and DA BOMB for Tops are from the Black (Negro is no longer PC) sub-culture (also no longer PC) which for some reason has become adopted avidly by the culture at large.  Why this is so is not the proper object of this space, but what is is that an old, white academic like me knows what DA BOMB was, which like phat, has become only for lame white dudes trying to be hep (no longer hip).   
   
   
RATING: ;D ;D   
Three grins = Loved it; Two grins = Enjoyed it; One grin = A bit bland for my taste; One teardrop = Not much fun   
60
Today's Puzzles / Re: Thu., 3/5 C.C. Burnikel
« Last post by LARadioRewind on March 07, 2015, 04:06:05 PM »
Yes, but which My Way did you prefer, Frank Sinatra's or Elvis Presley's? Elvis's version, released two months after he died in 1977, got to #22 on the Billboard Hot 100 and Sinatra's original peaked at #27 in 1969. Elvis's version also reached #2 on the country chart.
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