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31
Today's Puzzles / Re: Sun., 10/12 Skoczen & Varol
« Last post by pattybee on October 12, 2014, 04:38:42 PM »
Thanks for clarifying the theme.
32
Today's Puzzles / Re: Sun., 10/12 Skoczen & Varol
« Last post by LARadioRewind on October 12, 2014, 02:37:39 PM »
Today's Los Angeles Times crossword by Merl Reagle is titled "Uncommon People." The last part of each theme answer is a title of nobility, such as DUKE, EARL, COUNT, LORD, LADY and QUEEN. Another answer is ENDTITLES, which describes movie credits and is also the idea behind the puzzle's theme. Very clever!

Today's puzzle is the fifth in a month to include SSTS, this time clued with "Mach-1 breakers." INTERLOCKING was the answer for "Like crossword words." Crossword words intersect. Crossword words criss-cross. Crossword words don't really "interlock." And Reagle used one clue that is one of the most horrible puns ever made: "Sound of ju-bull-ation?" The answer is OLE, which appears in a lot of puzzles. At least Reagle came up with a clue that is different than the usual "Bullfight cheer." I give him a D- for the pun but I give him an A for effort.
33
Today's Puzzles / Re: Sat., 10/11 Tom Heilman
« Last post by magus on October 12, 2014, 09:25:59 AM »
NOHOW was clued with "'Forget about it!'" The word is substandard English and the clue doesn't even make sense.

LARR---

"No how" is substandard, but it does make sense, kinda.  When the guys in my old neighborhood said "Forget about it" they did not actually mean to forget, but to ignore any debate.  "No how" suggests the same.

"She ain't no good now how" and "She's so bad forget about it" both suggest the case against her is closed --- at least in the Brooklyn projects.

 
34
Today's Puzzles / Sun., 10/12 Skoczen & Varol
« Last post by magus on October 12, 2014, 09:13:49 AM »
THEME:   Despite the "Twelve Step Puzzle" title I don't know the theme --- I'm sure it's clever, but I lack the patience to figure it out.  :'(
   
GOOD ONES:    
Zesty start, in London?   ZED [Z is first letter of "zesty"]   
When two hands meet?   AT NOON   
Short side?   SLAW ["side" dish of cole "slaw"]   
Household cleaner   RAG [not a product for purchase]   
Gamer's game face   AVATAR [not his expression]   
Peek or bug ending    A-BOO [not the end of snooping]   
   
BTW:   
IRIS-IN is an effect we no longer see in movies --- I suspect it's distracting, except maybe in comedies.   
   
I'd accept quatre and sept, but not ONZE because the French 4 and 7 are found in words we see and their roots are deciferable; not so of the French 11.   
   
O.K., I felt bad about the theme so I spent some time on it.  The last word of phrases can precede "STEP."   
   
RATING:  ;D ;D   
Three grins = Loved it; Two grins = Enjoyed it; One grin = A bit bland for my taste; One teardrop = Not much fun   
35
Today's Puzzles / Re: Sat., 10/11 Tom Heilman
« Last post by LARadioRewind on October 11, 2014, 05:09:02 PM »
Today's puzzle included SSTS, clued with "Former fliers." In the past month, this is the fourth puzzle to use SST or SSTS. The clues for the other appearances of SST were "Bygone boomer," "Orly bird, once" and "Former Mach 2 flier, briefly." I wish puzzle makers were as good as coming up with different answers as they are at using the same answers far too often and coming up with different clues.

NOHOW was clued with "'Forget about it!'" The word is substandard English and the clue doesn't even make sense. Another clue was "Previously in print" and the answer was ABOVE. If a passage in a published story or article contains a reference to something that had already been mentioned, the passage might include the word ABOVE in parentheses, but only if the second reference appears on the same page and in the same column. The clue is inappropriate because the word "previous" usually refers to an earlier time or to a former condition. The clue could have been "Aforementioned in print" but it still would not make sense unless a second mention of something appears beneath the original reference. A front-page story may mention an SST and the page-7 continuation of the story may mention the SST again, so we can say that the first reference was "aforementioned" but it is certainly not "above." Yes, I'm picky. I know. Let's forget the whole thing and change the clue to "Buck Owens hit, '____ & Beyond.'"
36
Today's Puzzles / Re: WSJ inaccurate clue
« Last post by magus on October 11, 2014, 09:06:44 AM »
Martin---

When history impacts on word definitions, history becomes relevant on this site.

It appears that you may be guilty of revisionism in our history of the American Revolution.  The Boston Tea Party is famous for "No taxation without representation."  If the Tea Partyers were not against taxation, as the clue states, wence the quotation?

Further discussion of history probably should not appear here as both sides have been expressed.  If you wish to respond you can reach me at magus@triad.rr.com.   
37
Today's Puzzles / Sat., 10/11 Tom Heilman
« Last post by magus on October 11, 2014, 08:47:54 AM »
THEME:   none
   
GOOD ONES:     
Car starter?   ECO   
Passing thoughts?   OBIT   
   
BTW:   
Restaurant convenience   MENS ROOM [as opposed to the "inconvenience" of an outhouse?  --- hard to think of the toilet as a mere convenience]   
   
   
RATING:    ;D ;D
Three grins = Loved it; Two grins = Enjoyed it; One grin = A bit bland for my taste; One teardrop = Not much fun   
38
General Discussion / Re: Seeking a mentor
« Last post by mmcbs on October 11, 2014, 07:03:02 AM »
I'm a relative newbie, but have had a few puzzles published and have learned a lot in that process. I'd be glad to look at one. mcclain.salem@gmail.com. You might also consider posting one on the post a puzzle section of this forum.
39
General Discussion / Re: "NCA" -- Will Shortz accept?
« Last post by mmcbs on October 11, 2014, 06:58:23 AM »
Almost certainly a no-go with NYT or anyone else, for that matter, IMO. Agree, you need to rip out this section and keep trying for a clean fill. If you don't like it, the editor won't either. Most of the puzzles sent to NYT get rejected, usually because the theme doesn't measure up, or some of the fill is unacceptable, occasionally because they just get so many good ones it's not possible to approve them all. I just had one rejected as a "near miss". I will keep trying.
40
Today's Puzzles / Re: WSJ inaccurate clue
« Last post by LARadioRewind on October 10, 2014, 07:51:57 PM »
Following the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, President Bush announced plans to go to war in Iraq. France refused to join us. France refused to even support us. Anti-French sentiment began to spread and many US restaurants changed their menus so French fries and French toast became "Freedom fries" and "Freedom toast."

So I'm thinkin' that if the new Colonists really wanted to sever ties with England, they would have found something to drink besides tea.

We have interesting discussions here. ;)
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