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31
Today's Puzzles / Fri., 11/14 Steve Salmon
« Last post by magus on November 14, 2014, 09:27:37 AM »
THEME:   commonly misspelled words
   
GOOD ONES:     
This puzzles five longest answers are common ones   MISPELLINGS [including this one!]   
Selling points   MALLS [places, not assets]   
Island loop   LEI [flowers, not travel]   
Sicilian capital?   ESS [the word, not place]   
Attorney's thing   RES [Latin for thing, not belonging to a lawyer]   
Douglas and others   FIRS [trees, not people]   
Place with berth rights   MARINA   
   
BTW:   
As the worst speller in Mrs. Morganroth's third grade class, the "misspellings" made sense to me.   :-[   
   
SIPS doesn't get ON:  She sipped the tea; she sipped tea; she sipped on tea?  But, the Koalas chewed on eucalyptus; the rich supped on filet mignon and Spaghetti-O's.   
   
FILS is purely French.

Two gems in a row!   
   
   
RATING:    ;D ;D ;D
Three grins = Loved it; Two grins = Enjoyed it; One grin = A bit bland for my taste; One teardrop = Not much fun   
32
General Discussion / Re: Clue for KHAKI
« Last post by mmcbs on November 14, 2014, 08:24:23 AM »
I'll chime in with "Navy hue" or "Uniform tan" (U.S. Navy still wears khaki uniforms) - both of those should get some solvers off the track.
33
General Discussion / Re: Clue for KHAKI
« Last post by acpracht on November 13, 2014, 04:39:54 PM »
"Dusty tan" might suffice, but I was thinking to phrase it in such as way as to cause a possible mis-interpretation of "tan" (as in the color) for the verb "tan."
34
Today's Puzzles / Re: Thu., 11/13 Jerome Gunderson
« Last post by LARadioRewind on November 13, 2014, 02:59:18 PM »
TIN was clued with "English can," a clue that is also used for LOO.

The Los Angeles Daily News is always four weeks behind in publishing each day's New York Times crossword. I know not why. But the puzzle appearing today had no across clues or down clues, just clues. For every square that began an across word and a down word, there was a single clue and both words shared the first letter and combined to form a phrase. Clue #1 was "Corn or cotton" and the answer was CASHCROP, with CASH going across and CROP going down. Clue #27, "Dessert often made with cream cheese frosting," referred to CARROTCAKE, with CARROT going across and CAKE going down. Among the other combination answers were FREEZE & FRAME and BUNSEN & BURNER. The theme of two-word phrases with a shared letter was a very clever idea, one which I had never seen before.

The best clue/answer, however, was "Be unsuited?" The word was SKINNYDIP. :)
35
General Discussion / Re: Clue for KHAKI
« Last post by LARadioRewind on November 13, 2014, 02:46:31 PM »
Hey, fella, I don't like your khaki attitude! Now that I've gotten that horrible pun out of the way, I will point out that colors are of a certain shade, not in a certain shade, but "Tan of a dusty shade" sounds awkward. I sugget using "Dusty shade of tan" or perhaps just "Dusty tan."
36
General Discussion / Re: Question about weekday themes
« Last post by mmcbs on November 13, 2014, 11:14:59 AM »
Unless there is something unusual about the theme that requires the non-standard format, it would be expected to be symmetrical. You might get by with just the two 11's and the 15 in the center, but 4 or 5 themers would be more conventional. See "basic rules" in the resource section (left menu)
37
General Discussion / Question about weekday themes
« Last post by pucks1968 on November 13, 2014, 10:59:10 AM »
Hello.
With regarding to a weekday theme, must there be “symmetry” if I have four thematic answers?
I was thinking of 11 letters top left… 11 letters bottom right… then 15 letters going straight through the middle. 
Can I then have 11 letters going down somewhere?  Or is symmetry needed, and thus, another down answer required?
Thanks in advance for any responses!
38
Today's Puzzles / Thu., 11/13 Jerome Gunderson
« Last post by magus on November 13, 2014, 09:11:11 AM »
THEME:   G added to the front of a common phrase
   
GOOD ONES:    
Place for a nagging passenger?   GRUMBLE SEAT   
Tribute to a sourpuss?   GRUMP ROAST   
Pay back?   -OLA   
Zebras that don't fear Lions?   REFS [note capital L]   
Joltless joe?   DECAF [Joltin' Joe DiMaggio was a slugger; joe is coffee]   
   
BTW:   
This puzzle is a gem in many ways, but I'll bet the editor changed the clue for GRACE COURSE, which had been something like "Debutante training?"   
   
RATING: ;D ;D ;D   
Three grins = Loved it; Two grins = Enjoyed it; One grin = A bit bland for my taste; One teardrop = Not much fun   
39
Today's Puzzles / Re: Wed., 11/12 C.C. Burnikel
« Last post by LARadioRewind on November 12, 2014, 05:21:25 PM »
I don't give grins. I don't even play a grin-giver on tv. But can we award a half-grin for today's puzzle? The DATA theme was nice but there are 42 black squares, an amount that is becoming increasingly common. I prefer fewer black squares and longer answers. And today's puzzle may have set a world's record for the highest number of abbrebviations and foreign words in a 15x15 crossword: ABS, ALA, ATEST, DIEM, DSO, EDS, ELS, GTO, KAN, MIC, MRE, NUS, REBS, ROI, SER, STL, SYL, TDGARDEN, ULNAE and UVRAY. I want to see real words.
40
Today's Puzzles / Wed., 11/12 C.C. Burnikel
« Last post by magus on November 12, 2014, 08:54:34 AM »
THEME:   the letter run D,A,T,A found in random phrases
   
GOOD ONES:     
NSA surveillance activity {& theme}  DATA MINING   
One of four in Minnesota: Abbr.   SYL [the name, not the place]   
   
BTW:   
Occupied, as a booth   SAT AT [nope, that's at a table --- we sit in a booth]   
   
   
RATING:    ;D
Three grins = Loved it; Two grins = Enjoyed it; One grin = A bit bland for my taste; One teardrop = Not much fun   
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