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31
General Discussion / Regarding LA times submission specification
« Last post by psbhat89 on February 26, 2015, 08:53:11 AM »
Hello,

Hello, this is my first post here. I have a few questions regarding submission of a crossword to LA Times for review:
1) In the body of the mail, should I only list the theme entries and theme clues?
2) How do I submit the grid and clues? Should I copy the grid and clues to wordpad/notepad and submit as an attachment or should I only attach the .ccw file with the mail?

Thanks,
-Parikshit


32
Today's Puzzles / Re: Wed., 2/25 Jeffrey Wechsler
« Last post by LARadioRewind on February 25, 2015, 07:55:03 PM »
A cameo originally was---and still is---a carving, as of a bird or a human figure, which appears in relief on a vase, a piece of jewelry or other object. A cameo is raised above the surface and is the opposite of an intaglio, which is carved below a surface. According to the Oxford English Dictionary, "cameo" came to also mean "a short literary sketch or portrait" and now refers to any small role in a movie, usually a non-speaking role and usually involving a well-known actor. Twenty-five of the mostest bestest cameo appearances can be seen at:

http://www.esquire.com/entertainment/movies/a27826/best-a-list-cameos/
33
Today's Puzzles / Wed., 2/25 Jeffrey Wechsler
« Last post by magus on February 25, 2015, 08:50:59 AM »
THEME:   reinterpreted movie phrases
   
GOOD ONES:     
Jeweler's movie role?  CAMEO APPEARANCE   
{theme}  TYPE CASTING   
Heavy metal cover   ARMOR [I'm so hip (once a cool cat) I thought rock records]   
   
BTW:   
Invite as a member of   BRING INTO [what if the invitation is not accepted?]   
   
RATING: ;D ;D   
Three grins = Loved it; Two grins = Enjoyed it; One grin = A bit bland for my taste; One teardrop = Not much fun   
34
Today's Puzzles / Tue., 2/24 C.C. Burnikel
« Last post by magus on February 24, 2015, 09:07:31 AM »
THEME:   first word of phrase can be preceded by STUFFED
   
GOOD ONES:    
Comment after a feast {& theme}   I'M STUFFED   
   
BTW:   
Cash for fun   PIN MONEY [can be, but mostly it's a small amount of money that can be used in case of emergencies --- or perhaps incidentals]   
   
RATING: :'(   
Three grins = Loved it; Two grins = Enjoyed it; One grin = A bit bland for my taste; One teardrop = Not much fun   
35
Today's Puzzles / Re: Mon., 2/23 Kurt Krauss
« Last post by LARadioRewind on February 23, 2015, 04:37:30 PM »
CALIFORNIARAISINS was too lengthy to fit in Krauss's puzzle...and that's fine with me. The California Raisins were an anthropomorphic r&b group who appeared in commercials for the California Raisin Advisory Board in the latter half of the 1980s. The fictitious group even released four albums! Some people liked the Raisins. I did not. Krauss's puzzle included ADE, MEMO, PYRE and STAY. Read on.

I seldom work the NEA crosswords which appears in the Daily News because they are only 13x13 and are far too easy to solve. Seldom are there any words of more than eight letters. Today I was bored so I did the NEA puzzle. There were 36 black squares, an awfully high number for such a small puzzle. "Lion sound" was ROAR. "Jai ___" was ALAI. "Uncommon" was RARE. I told you these puzzles are far too easy to solve! And guess what? Today's also included ADE, MEMO, PYRE and STY.
36
Today's Puzzles / Re: Sun., 2/22 Alex Vratsanos
« Last post by LARadioRewind on February 23, 2015, 04:23:40 PM »
Washington's birthday was combined with Lincoln's birthday (which was celebrated by only a few states) to create the Presidents Day holiday. Some states still acknowledge Washington's birthday. See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lincoln's_Birthday

Veterans were outraged in 1971 when the Veterans Day holiday was moved from November 11 to the fourth Monday in October. In 1978 it returned to its original date.

Merl Reagle's Sunday Los Angeles Times crossword, published on the day of the 87th annual Academy Awards ceremony, had a theme of "Two Stars". Among the theme answers were these:

Comic actor + comic actress = ? CRYSTALBALL
Actress Lauren + star of West Side Story = ? HOLLYWOOD
Actor Jack + a Best Actress Oscar winner = ? BLACKBERRY
37
Today's Puzzles / Mon., 2/23 Kurt Krauss
« Last post by magus on February 23, 2015, 09:28:36 AM »
THEME:   states with foods for which they are known
   
GOOD ONES:     
none   
   
BTW:   
don't think GEORGIA PEANUTS are especially well-known --- looks like PEACHES, for which Georgia is famous, was too tough   
   
Degree recipient   ALUM [I guess, but a degree recipient seems more a graduate than an alumnus]   
   
Would-be social worker's maj.   PSY [nope, it's PSYCH, and social workers would likely major in sociology or Soc]   
   
Throb   PULSE [possible, but PULSE is usually a noun; pulsate the verb]   
   
   
RATING: :'(
Three grins = Loved it; Two grins = Enjoyed it; One grin = A bit bland for my taste; One teardrop = Not much fun   
38
Today's Puzzles / Sun., 2/22 Alex Vratsanos
« Last post by magus on February 22, 2015, 09:43:56 AM »
THEME:   phrases with six T's
   
GOOD ONES:     
Title: "The 60's" [pronounced "6 T's"]   
Money changers?: Abbr.   EDS [Money magazine editors]   
Ship staff   MAST   
Zenophile?   STOIC [followers of Zeno, not "xenophile," if there is such a word]   
Apple sites   ORCHARDS [kind of sensed it had nothing to do with computers]   
Little work for a gardener?   BONSAI [only the plant is little]   
Butler created by Mitchell   Rhett [thought it was a butler who's name I couldn't recall]   
Long range   ANDES [thought it was some missle program I never heard of]   
Royal pain?   PEA ["The Priness and the Pea" also known as my wife, except she's not a pain but is pained --- OK, TMI]   
   
BTW:   
ONZE and ICI are not in our lexicon.  I wonder if especially the French would allow English words in their Xwords.

Today is Washington's birthday, but I'm dismayed that our greatest American has lost his name day.  Sorry for the downer, but when I typed in the date I was struck with sadness --- and I'm not even particularly patriotic, at least not anymore.   
   
   
RATING: ;D ;D ;D   
Three grins = Loved it; Two grins = Enjoyed it; One grin = A bit bland for my taste; One teardrop = Not much fun   
39
General Discussion / Re: Newbie Seeking Theme Advice
« Last post by jorkel on February 21, 2015, 06:10:47 PM »
This idea might fall into the theme class where a single word is used to define three or more theme entries (for a 15x15 daily puzzle;  I don't think the idea is interesting enough to supersize it to a 21x21 Sunday puzzle). 

You'd have to pair up the best ones lengthwise, but the general idea illustrated here:
SANDIEGOTEAM (12) - [Chargers]
PHONEPLUGINS (12) - [Chargers]
DODGEMUSCLECARS (15) - [Chargers]
CREDITCARDUSERS (15) - [Chargers]
WHIPITCANISTERS (15) - [Chargers]
UNDERPLATES (11) - [Chargers]
HEAVYHORSES (11) - [Chargers]
etc.

Now having said that, I don't find the last three entries very interesting / gettable.  Plus, the idea has now been discussed in an open forum, so may not be viable with some editors.

What you could take away from this example is a template for designing something similar.  I.e., virtually any word which has three or more distinct (and interesting) usages could be employed here.  With just three crisp and lively theme entries you'd be good to go.

-Joe





40
General Discussion / Crossynergy error with Adobe shockwave
« Last post by Bob on February 21, 2015, 01:11:09 PM »
Is anyone else having trouble loading the Crossynergy puzzle?  I keep getting a "Shockwave cannot load" error message.  I reinstalled the latest version of Shockwave, but still get the same error message.
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