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31
Today's Puzzles / Sat., 5/16 Gareth Bain
« Last post by magus on May 16, 2015, 08:57:08 AM »
THEME:   none, but two fifteens cross at center
   
GOOD ONES:     
Goes for the flies   SWATS [of course I had shags which means to catch flies (baseball) while SWATS means to hit (baseball); both mean in some sense "goes for flies" --- and of course so does killing the little buggers]   
   
BTW:   
Job, metaphorically   HAT ['He wears many hats" is jobspeak which is right up there with "He's come aboard" and "Let's run it up the flag pole..."]   
   
Interesting that from 10- through 14-Down we have an international cast, so to speak.   
   
Back-to-back contests?   DUELS [this one tickled me in that if the clue were correct Alexander Hamilton may have lived longer]   
   
Level, e.g.   TOOL [not a week goes by when I don't use one yet this one didn't come immediately, but levels never do (one has to go get them) :-[ ]   
   
Ready signal   ALL SYSTEMS ARE GO [one needs to believe that speech is a signal, which I don't; speech is speech and signals are signs or sounds.  I remember in grade school peeved teachers would say, "I don't remember giving the signal to talk!" But I never did hear that "signal."]   
   
RATING:    ;D ;D
Three grins = Loved it; Two grins = Enjoyed it; One grin = A bit bland for my taste; One teardrop = Not much fun   
32
Today's Puzzles / Re: Thu., 5/14 Kevin Christian
« Last post by LARadioRewind on May 15, 2015, 03:48:19 PM »
Thank you for that explanation, Mister maegus. :)
33
Today's Puzzles / Re: Fri., May 15 Melanie Miller
« Last post by LARadioRewind on May 15, 2015, 03:46:13 PM »
"Allows to use" is a reference to a person. That was the clue for LEND, which is a reference to an object. Oops!

The Daily News crossword included HEAD1st, LEAP2nd and 3rdRAIL. Each
ordinal number was in a single square. The intersecting answers were THEBOY1stCRIEDWOLF, GUESS2nd and TELLMESOMETHING3rd. For the answers to make sense, you have to substitute WHO for 1st, WHAT for 2nd and IDONTKNOW for 3rd. Yes, the crossword is a tribute to the 1945 Abbott & Costello "Who's on first" routine. Abbott was talking about the players on his baseball team and Costello couldn't understand that Who is on first, What is on second and I Don't Know is on third. The duo performed the sketch many times. The lengthiest version was in the movie The Naughty Nineties. Here is a version from their tv series:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kTcRRaXV-fg

"When you pay the first baseman, who gets the money?" "Yes, every dollar. Sometimes his wife comes down and collects it." "Whose wife?" "That's right." :)
34
Today's Puzzles / Re: Thu., 5/14 Kevin Christian
« Last post by magus on May 15, 2015, 09:06:47 AM »
Rewind---
We have no single letter to represent the ae diphthong used in very early English and Greek orthography.  We are therefore forced to use the digraph ae if we choose to use the grapheme at all.  Mostly we just drop the letter a, but some linguistic conservatives prefer the digraph, which to most of us seems a bit pretentious.
35
Today's Puzzles / Fri., May 15 Melanie Miller
« Last post by magus on May 15, 2015, 08:53:34 AM »
THEME:   intrusive NET
   
GOOD ONES:     
Taxable amount {& theme}   NET GAIN [in fact, the phrase gained NET]   
   
Dark-haired brigade?   BRUNETTE FORCE [minus NET = BRUTE FORCE]   
   
End of basketball?   ELS [spelling end, that is]   
   
Deuce follower   AD IN [I though cards: trey]   
   
Chick bar?   ROOST [can there really be a bar frequented mainly by nubiles, or must it be a gay bar?]   
   
Person, slangily   EGG ["he's a good egg"]   
   
Doctor, perhaps   EDIT ["doctor" can connote a change in text not needed or wanted by the author --- exactly how I felt about all of my editors, except for Will Weng, of course]   
   
   
RATING:    ;D ;D ;D
Three grins = Loved it; Two grins = Enjoyed it; One grin = A bit bland for my taste; One teardrop = Not much fun   
36
Today's Puzzles / Re: Wed., 5/13 Grabowski & Venkze
« Last post by LARadioRewind on May 14, 2015, 04:50:56 PM »
I have seen LISA clued with "Stay singer Loeb." Lisa Loeb, born in Bethesda, Maryland, is a singer/guitarist whose first song, Stay, went to number one in 1994.

DOH has appeared in several crosswords and is always clued with a reference to Homer Simpson. I have mentioned elsewhere that "Doh!" was an indignant expression uttered by Laurel & Hardy co-star James Finlayson in dozens of 1920s-30s-40s comedy films. The "Way Out West" branch of the Laurel & Hardy fan club "Sons Of The Desert"---both organizations were named after L&H films---has a brief biography of the Scottish-born actor with the squinty eyes and thick mustache:

http://www.wayoutwest.org/finlayson/bio.html
37
Today's Puzzles / Re: Thu., 5/14 Kevin Christian
« Last post by LARadioRewind on May 14, 2015, 04:37:54 PM »
I, too, objected to ASHORE as a "way" to be washed. ASHORE is a place or a direction to be washed to. The crossword also included AEONS, which frequently appears in puzzles although I doubt that anyone really spells the word that way. It is always EON. Perhaps someone can aexplain the use of AEON. (See what I did there?)

"'70s Sonny & Cher label" was KAPP. The record label was founded in 1954 by David Kapp, whose brother Jack had started Decca Records twenty years earlier. Most of Sonny & Cher's hits, including I Got You Babe, were released by Atco. They had three hits on Kapp in 1971-72: All I Ever Need Is You, A Cowboy's Work Is Never Done and When You Say Love, which was adapted from a 1970 beer commercial, "When you say Budweiser, you've said it all." Thousands of old rock'n'roll songs have been used in commercials, many of them with the lyrics changed---remember YMCA becoming "P-E-P-S-I" and Viva Las Vegas becoming "Viva viagra"?---but there have been very few commercial jingles turned into songs. The most well-known example: "I'd like to buy the world a Coke" became a hit for the New Seekers, I'd Like To Teach The World To Sing.
38
Today's Puzzles / Re: Wed., 5/13 Grabowski & Venkze
« Last post by Filer on May 14, 2015, 12:17:48 PM »
NEAT could be clued as uncluttered; neat and tidy.
39
Today's Puzzles / Re: Wed., 5/13 Grabowski & Venkze
« Last post by magus on May 14, 2015, 08:40:01 AM »
Hi, Filer---

That is exactly what I meant by straight up.  Is there another possibility for NEAT?
40
Today's Puzzles / Thu., 5/14 Kevin Christian
« Last post by magus on May 14, 2015, 08:36:05 AM »
THEME:   BAN, BEN, BIN, BON, and BUN defined in that order
   
GOOD ONES:    
Sixth-day creation   BEAST [might've been ANT or OX]   
One way to be washed   ASHORE [is that a way or a place?]   
   
BTW:   
Greek org.   SOR [also the great Spanish composer Fernando]   
   
Lash LaRue was an early movie cowboy who settled things with a bull whip.   
   
   
RATING: ;D ;D   
Three grins = Loved it; Two grins = Enjoyed it; One grin = A bit bland for my taste; One teardrop = Not much fun   
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