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31
Today's Puzzles / Re: Sat., 3/14 Gail Grabowski
« Last post by LARadioRewind on March 14, 2015, 02:51:15 PM »
"Two-pack Shakur." It's nice to know that I'm not the only one here who can make bad puns. :)

I, too, object to the word ELHI, although it does appear in most dictionaries. Merriam-Webster defines it as "informal Of, relating to, or intended for use in grades 1 to 12." Grey House Publishing has a catalog listing more than 190,000 textbooks. It's called EL-HI TEXTBOOKS & SERIALS IN PRINT 2015 and I assume the title is in capital letters because, when written with small letters, the second letter of "El-Hi" could easily be mistaken for a capital I.

http://www.greyhouse.com/bowk_elhi.htm

It was nice to see a reference to the 1938 Laurel & Hardy film Block-Heads as the clue to STANLAUREL. Unaware that the World War was over, soldier Stan had been guarding his post for 20 years. After he shot at a passing airplane and wound up finally being brought back home, his story appeared in the newspaper. Ollie saw the story and went to the Veterans Home, where..... Oh, the movie has to be seen, not merely described. A colorized Block-Heads is on good ol' YouTube. "Why didn't you tell me you had two legs?" "You didn't ask me. I've always had 'em."

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sd4QeD-6S5k

 

 
32
Today's Puzzles / Re: Fri., 3/13 Marti DuGuay-Carpenter
« Last post by magus on March 14, 2015, 09:23:05 AM »
Something repeated twice would be reiterated, and I do use iterate occasionally --- but I must say in this I am in a very small minority.
33
Today's Puzzles / Re: Thu., 3/12 Alex Miller
« Last post by magus on March 14, 2015, 09:20:41 AM »
Thanks, rbe, I remember that great scene of Meg Ryan's but had forgotten that it was at Katz'.
34
Today's Puzzles / Sat., 3/14 Gail Grabowski
« Last post by magus on March 14, 2015, 09:18:25 AM »
THEME:   none, but only 28 blocks   
      
GOOD ONES:       
No-brainer?   IDIOT      
Pack leader?   SIX [and his more famous brother, Two-pack Shakur]      
Passing legislation?   ESTATE LAW      
Swap magazines   RELOAD [I thought publications until the correct meaning just shot into my head]      
It's not a complex number   BALLAD [I thought mathematics until the right note struck me]      
      
BTW:      
EL-HI is not used, except in X-words.  In the real world it's K-12 (which sounds like a spot remover).      
      
ALORS      Nous ne parlons pas fran├žais ici   
      
      
RATING: ;D ;D ;D {despite my prejudice for themed puzzles}      
Three grins = Loved it; Two grins = Enjoyed it; One grin = A bit bland for my taste; One teardrop = Not much fun      
35
Today's Puzzles / Re: Thu., 3/12 Alex Miller
« Last post by rbe on March 13, 2015, 07:41:25 PM »
Of course Katz' is also famous for Meg Ryan's scene in "When Harry Met Sally."
36
Today's Puzzles / Re: Fri., 3/13 Marti DuGuay-Carpenter
« Last post by LARadioRewind on March 13, 2015, 05:00:30 PM »
I'm starting to take note of all the words which are seldom spoken but often appear in crosswords. Today we have EGAD and AGOG and, in one of the Daily News puzzles, APER. The clue was "Mimic."

Today's crossword included ITERATE, which comes from the Latin iterare, meaning "repeat." Very few people use the word. Most say "reiterate," which, according to the Department of Redundancy Department, is an unnecessary redundancy which is not necessary. However, the Latin language includes not only iterare but reiterare, proof that we Americans are not the originators of redundancies.
37
Today's Puzzles / Re: Thu., 3/12 Alex Miller
« Last post by magus on March 13, 2015, 09:33:46 AM »
In a Kosher deli, the counterman would call a bagel order to the food preparer.  If the bagel order contained cream cheese, the counterman would add, "...with a schmear."  Every employee seemed at his limit of patience, the places were stark at best, but the food was great and well worth the prices.  (My work sometimes would take me near Katz' Deli in Lower Manhattan, and I ate there at every chance.)
38
Today's Puzzles / Fri., 3/13 Marti DuGuay-Carpenter
« Last post by magus on March 13, 2015, 09:21:21 AM »
THEME:   initial R in phrases makes new phrases   
      
GOOD ONES:        
Answer to "What did people listen to during the Depresion, senor?"   RADIOS AMIGO      
Allowance for food, vet visits, etc.   ROVER BUDGET [I bet most of costs are over budget]      
Handle for a chef?   STU [SUE might fit]      
Draft choice   ALE [not athlete or soldier]      
Avis adjective   RARA [rare bird, not economical]      
      
BTW:      
Today we have a decidedly Jewish cast:  DELI, SAHL, NOSH, and ROTH (Zuckerman)      
      
I appreciated the references to Shelley and Frost      
      
Dolts   OAFS [dolts are fools; oafs are clumsy]      
      
PEU   Nous ne parlons pas fran├žais ici      
      
RATING: ;D ;D ;D      
Three grins = Loved it; Two grins = Enjoyed it; One grin = A bit bland for my taste; One teardrop = Not much fun      
39
Today's Puzzles / Re: Mon., 3/9 Carol Hacker
« Last post by LARadioRewind on March 12, 2015, 04:37:11 PM »
'Sblood, Squire Magus, dost thou regard me as a knave or a varlet? Forsooth, I am well aware that we ofttimes use words in quotidian correspondence which we fain would seldom use in speech. By my troth, I shall verily strive to compile a list of the multitudinous appearances of the many words that oft appear in crosswords but are almost ne'er spoken aloud. I shall forthwith begin with EKE, IRK, ASEA, AROAR, QUAFF and CELEB. Thou mayest feel free to proffer suggestions. (Clean suggestions. :) )
40
Today's Puzzles / Re: Thu., 3/12 Alex Miller
« Last post by LARadioRewind on March 12, 2015, 04:25:54 PM »
SCHMEAR comes from the Yiddish word shmir, which means "smear." I'm not Yiddish. Heck, I can't even find the country of Yiddia on any map! But how is SCHMEAR a "bagel topping"? Merriam-Webster defines schmear as "an aggregate of related things ('the whole schmear')." Who puts an "aggregate of related things" on a bagel?

I've gotten used to seeing CELEB, SITCOM, ROMCOM, NTEST, ATEST and other shortened words and phrases in crosswords but FANFIC is a new one. I hope I never see it again. It sounds like a curseword! MuggleNet is a site for fans of the Harry Potter books and movies. Fans are encouraged to write their own Harry Potter stories and post them to the site. J.K. Rowling has written seven Harry Potter books and has no plans to write an eighth one...otherwise, she could easily draw inspiration from all that fan fiction: "Thanks for coming up with the clever plot devices, kids!" :)

http://fanfiction.mugglenet.com/
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