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21
Today's Puzzles / Re: Wed., 11/19 C.C. Burnikel
« Last post by LARadioRewind on November 20, 2014, 02:46:51 PM »
My comment about leaving some unpicked nits on the tree was a joke, son---a joke.

Authors and playwrights use contemporary language. I would never refer to an author as archaic but in the year 2014 a lot of the words found in great literature are now archaic. I don't want to see archaic words in puzzles. You know I even consider "afro" to be archaic! Anyone who is interested in words---which is probably everybody who comes to this site---will enjoy this huge list of now-archaic words that appear in Shakespeare's writings. Definitions are included:

http://www.shakespearestudyguide.com/Archaisms.html
22
Today's Puzzles / Re: Thu., 11/20 Jeffrey Wechsler
« Last post by LARadioRewind on November 20, 2014, 02:37:20 PM »
I, too, loathe the expression "Yada yada yada"...and I've seen YADA in quite a few puzzles recently. Even one "yada" is too many.

Today's crossword has 42 black squares, and that number is another thing I'm seeing in far too many puzzles. Use no more than 36, puzzle makers. Thirty-two or fewer is even better. Make me happy. In today's crossword are four foreign words (COSI, EAU, ETTU, OLE), ten abbreviations (ADT, ALA, AOL, AVE, BTW, CSI, ENT, LITHO, OAS, SAS), an archaic word (OER) and Roman numerals (III). There are also three similar terms: AFEW, ALOT, ATON. But there is one bright spot: the puzzle includes the first name of actor Keir Dullea, which I had never before seen in a
crossword. Dullea appeared in dozens of tv shows and movies, including The Thin Red Line, Bunny Lake Is Missing and 2001: A Space Odyssey. His latest film is Space Station 76 (2014). So this week we've seen the names of Sabu and Keir Dullea in crosswords. Maybe Zasu Pitts, Faye Bainter or Vera Hruba Ralston will be next.
23
Today's Puzzles / Re: Wed., 11/19 C.C. Burnikel
« Last post by magus on November 20, 2014, 09:01:10 AM »
Rewind---

You're spot-on about SAYSOS; they are not the authorities themselves but their powers.  However, nits are not picked from trees --- more likely in hair.  As for KNAVE, Dickens used it when Pip was being ridiculed by Estella: "He calls the knaves jacks!"  We don't refer to 19th Century novelists as archaic.
24
Today's Puzzles / Thu., 11/20 Jeffrey Wechsler
« Last post by magus on November 20, 2014, 08:38:41 AM »
THEME:   nasty characters hiding in random phrases: BRAT, DEVIL, IMP, SCAMP
   
GOOD ONES:     
Mischievous ones hiding in plain sight  TROUBLEMAKERS   
Industrialist who's had his ups and downs?   OTIS   
   
BTW:   
Why do I loathe YADA, YADA, YADA?   
   
Why don't I understand how "One in a sports page column" means WIN?   
   
   
RATING:    ;D ;D
Three grins = Loved it; Two grins = Enjoyed it; One grin = A bit bland for my taste; One teardrop = Not much fun   
25
Today's Puzzles / Re: Wed., 11/19 C.C. Burnikel
« Last post by LARadioRewind on November 19, 2014, 02:30:29 PM »
I'm going to do some nitpicking. I'll leave a few nits on the tree in case anybody else wants to pick some. Today's crossword had 40 black squares---too many for my taste. There were four foreign words (EINS, IBN, ROI, STE) and five brand names (ADIDAS, COSTCO, IBM, KOHLS and OSH, short for OshKosh B'Gosh). The word KNAVE dates from the 11th century. It appears in this puzzle. This is the first time I've seen or heard the archaic word in the 21st century. And SAYSOS was clued with "Ultimate authorities." A "say-so" is defined by Random House as an unsupported assertion, an authoritative pronouncement or the right of final decision. Say-sos are not "authorities." The people who make the say-sos are the authorities. Burnikel should have used a different clue.

Among the answers in the puzzle in today's Daily News are the literary character HUCKLEFINN, the hair color STRAWBLONDE and the Prince song RASPBERET. Another answer is singer CHUCKBERRY. Get it? The solver has to chuck the word "berry" to get the theme answers. Very clever!
26
General Discussion / Re: Clue for KHAKI
« Last post by acpracht on November 19, 2014, 12:38:35 PM »
Ooh. I like "Uniform tan."

Thank you muchly!
27
Today's Puzzles / Re: Tue., 11/18 Marti DuGuay-Carpenter
« Last post by magus on November 19, 2014, 09:36:54 AM »
Outside shot is used by sports writers and commentators.  I used with the other kids in Brooklyn, and I have an outside shot of using once more before I shuffle off this mortal coil.
28
Today's Puzzles / Wed., 11/19 C.C. Burnikel
« Last post by magus on November 19, 2014, 09:30:54 AM »
THEME:   first word of phrase defines CLOUD
   
GOOD ONES:     
Virtual storage area {& theme}   THE CLOUD [BTW, when my modem died, so did my access to the cloud]   
Jalapen[~]o topper   TILDE    
Book keeper?   DUST JACKET [note two words of clue]   
   
BTW:   
"Coop groups" and "Lode loads" are, because of the -s, near rhymes.   
   
"Are we ___ not?": "Is it a date?"   ON OR [kind of a clumsy clue when "___about" would have done fine.]   
   
Go off on   RANT AT [possible, AT is not generally used with RANT: "go off on" might mean "hollar at"]   
   
Beyond belief   UNREAL [yes, in slang]   
   
A NUDIE may have a minimal costume budget but the make-up (& silicon) budget must be steep.  :)   
   
RATING:    ;D
Three grins = Loved it; Two grins = Enjoyed it; One grin = A bit bland for my taste; One teardrop = Not much fun   
29
Today's Puzzles / Re: Tue., 11/18 Marti DuGuay-Carpenter
« Last post by LARadioRewind on November 18, 2014, 03:50:26 PM »
Crosswords often include ERIE or EERIE but today's is the first one I've seen with both words. The puzzle also has 42 black squares---too many!---and four foreign words (BON, EAU, LOO, MAI).

As magus noted, the beginning and ending letters of the three theme answers spell SHOT. The answer that conveys the theme is OUTSIDESHOT. "Outside chance" is a common phrase. "Long shot" is a common phrase. "Outside shot" is not. That's the title of a book by Keith O'Brien about a Kentucky high-school basketball team but I've never heard any basketball announcer use the phrase. I don't think I've ever heard anyone use the phrase.
30
Today's Puzzles / Tue., 11/18 Marti DuGuay-Carpenter
« Last post by magus on November 18, 2014, 08:47:48 AM »
THEME:   S,H,O,T separated by an ordinary phrase
   
GOOD ONES:     
Short change?   OUTSIDE SHOT [the word SHOT is broken up such that it is on the "outside" of the phrase]   
   
BTW:   
As MAI clued as a French month is inappropriate, I'd go with the actress.   
   
   
RATING:    ;D
Three grins = Loved it; Two grins = Enjoyed it; One grin = A bit bland for my taste; One teardrop = Not much fun   
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