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21
General Discussion / Re: Crossword Tracker
« Last post by Thomps2525 on April 03, 2017, 08:12:06 PM »
The Crossword Tracker website is run by a company called Crossword Tracker. Yes, really. It's a Florida limited liability company based in Seattle and registered in 2013 to Jonathan D. Gales.

https://visulate.com/rental/visulate_search.php?CORP_ID=L13000173846

https://www.corporationwiki.com/p/2eh9ec/jonathan-gales

22
General Discussion / Crossword Tracker
« Last post by Pangram~Man on April 03, 2017, 07:00:58 PM »
Does anyone know who runs Crossword Tracker?
23
General Discussion / Re: Themeless Submissions... ?
« Last post by Thomps2525 on April 02, 2017, 03:53:25 PM »
Dave, you might try contacting Puzzlewright Press, a division of Sterling Publishing in New York City. They regularly publish books of themeless puzzles and might accept submissions.

https://www.sterlingpublishing.com/puzzlewright/

24
Today's Puzzles / The profound April 2 crossword
« Last post by Thomps2525 on April 02, 2017, 03:45:17 PM »
John Lampkin is a composer, musician and piano teacher living in New York. He began creating crosswords in 2008 and more than 100 of his puzzles have appeared in the New York Times, Los Angeles Times and other publications. Today's is titled "All In Favor" and includes eight familiar phrases altered by the addition of "pro":

Positively charged vehicle? ONEPROTONTRUCK
Competition at the geometry fair? PROTRACTORPULL
Website search response with an attitude: PAGENOTPROFOUND
"I'll give you five bucks for your Egyptian water lily"? LOTUSPROPOSITION
Quality control job at a maraschino factory? PROBINGCHERRIES
"A penny saved is hardly worth the effort"? IRREGULARPROVERB
Miscreant handling letters: MAILINREPROBATE
Feature of Charlie Brown's head? CIRCULARPROFILE

The English word "pro" comes from the Latin pro, which means "in front of'; in favor of'; on behalf of." 

During the first several years of the Peanuts comic strip, Charlie Brown's head was ovoid, not round. (And Snoopy walked on all fours like a normal dog.) Here is the first Peanuts comic from October 2, 1950 -- and yes, Shermy's comment was shockingly mean-spirited:

http://www.gocomics.com/peanuts/1950/10/02

"Writes ths clue, say" is ERRS. "Err" or "errs" appear quite frequently in crosswords. Puzzle makers have a difficult time coming up with different clues for a word that is used so often but today's clue was pretty clever.....or should I say "clevr"?

"'Scuse Me While __ This Guy' & Other Misheard Lyrics: Gavin Edwards book" is IKISS. In the 1967 song Purple Haze, Jimi Hendrix sings, "'Scuse me while I kiss the sky" but it does indeed sound more like "kiss this guy." In Creedence Clearwater Revival's Bad Moon Rising, John Fogerty sings "There's a bad moon on the rise" but many people hear the line as "There's a bathroom on the right." Another misheard lyric is Queen's "Kickin' your can all over the place" from We Will Rock You. Many people swear Freddie Mercury was saying "Kickin' your cat all over the place." Ouch! More than 119,000 misheard lyrics are posted on the KissThisGuy website:

http://www.kissthisguy.com

And now if you'll excuse me while I, uh, kiss the sky.




25
General Support / Re: Post a Puzzle
« Last post by atco418 on March 31, 2017, 02:29:35 PM »
I've run into this issue on both my computer (a really old mac, so I figured it was me) and also on brand new PCs at the library.  I can post in other places, but attachments never seem to work.
26
General Discussion / Re: Themeless Submissions... ?
« Last post by Pangram~Man on March 30, 2017, 12:54:28 PM »
Ok... Thanks for replying, Mark.
27
General Discussion / Re: Themeless Submissions... ?
« Last post by mmcbs on March 30, 2017, 12:49:11 PM »
Don't think there is.
28
General Discussion / Themeless Submissions... ?
« Last post by Pangram~Man on March 30, 2017, 12:39:49 PM »
Hello Cru,

Other than the NY Times and LA Times, does anyone know of other outlets that openly accepts submissions of themeless puzzles?

Dave
29
Today's Puzzles / The March 29 crossword is a stretch
« Last post by Thomps2525 on March 29, 2017, 04:10:08 PM »
Today's crossword by Jeff Stillman is his 22nd published puzzle since 2012. Stillman likes to do clever things with words. One of his puzzles included WINGSPAN and four long answers which started and ended with the letters in WING, such as WELLBEING and WASPSTING. Today's crossword is similar to the WINGSPAN puzzle. It includes WIDESPREAD ("Far-reaching") and the theme answers include the letters W, I, D and E spread out:

Rain-X auto product: WIPERBLADE
Many a military spouse: WARBRIDE
Electrician's basic knowledge: WIRINGCOLORCODE
Manhattan theater district locale: WESTSIDE

"Big name in gas" is AMOCO, "Laundry room brand" is TIDE, "'Grand' ice cream brand" is EDYS, "Chop House dog food brand" is ALPO, and of course we have the clue that mentions Rain-X. Puzzle editors used to object to the use of brand names. Used to.

"Risky purchase, metaphorically" is PIGINAPOKE. A poke -- the word comes from the French poque -- is a sack or a bag. In the 14th and 15th centuries, swindlers would often sell a bag which supposedly contained a pig to be used for food. The buyer would return home and open the bag, only to find that it contained a cat or a dog. I can't really feel sorry for anyone who would buy something without seeing it. This swindle is also the source of the expression, "Let the cat out of the bag."

"Feathered layer" was a clever clue for HEN. "Bedtime drink, in totspeak" is WAWA. I wonder if young children would use words such as "wawa," "horsie," "choo-choo" and "go nite-nite" if the parents didn't talk to them that way. "Dukes not among royalty" is FISTS. When we challenge someone to a fistfight, why do we say "Put up your dukes"? In Great Britain, "fork" is an old slang word meaning "hand." It's the source of the phrases "fork out" and "fork over." In Cockney rhyming slang, "fork" rhymes with "Duke of York" and therefore fists are "dukes." Bizarre, yes -- but that is the origin of the term. There are many hundreds of Cockney rhyming slang words.....and they are all collected here:

http://www.cockneyrhymingslang.co.uk

That ends the discussion of the WIDESPREAD puzzle. Now I'm going to go for a WALKOUTSIDE.
30
General Support / Unable to download puzzles attached to posts
« Last post by rgh on March 27, 2017, 02:06:03 PM »
I get "attachment not found" when I try to download posted puzzles using either Safari on the ipad or Firefox on a Windows PC. Clearing the Safari cache does not help.
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