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11
Today's Puzzles / Re: Sat., 10/18 Julian Lim
« Last post by LARadioRewind on October 18, 2014, 04:52:43 PM »
Houdini's real first name was Erich...or Erik...or Ehrik...or Ehrick. His last name was Weisz...or Weiss...or he changed his last name from Weisz to Weiss...or a US immigration official misspelled Weisz as Weiss. I'm glad we have so many resources online so we can get so many different answers! Now if we could just figure out which is correct. Most biographers agree that he took the name of Harry after his childhood nickname of "Eri"...or "Ehrie." He chose his last name in tribute to French magician Jean Robert-Houdin. Here is a well-illustrated history of Houdini's career:

http://www.magictricks.com/houdini-biography.html

Today's puzzle had far too many shortened words (ACADS, ALTHO, BDAY) and foreign words (ANNI, ANTIPASTI, INRE, NEE, SAIS, SRA, STAT, STE, TORTE). There was no theme but two of the answers were NBC and SIMPLEASABC. The puzzle could easily have used television networks and channels as a theme. It could have included these additional clues and answers:

Truckers' radios: CBS
Sudden surge: SPIKE
Put one over on: FOX
Birth-to-death span: LIFETIME
Prominent characteristic: HALLMARK

Maybe next time.

12
Today's Puzzles / Re: Sat., 10/18 Julian Lim
« Last post by rbe on October 18, 2014, 11:34:40 AM »
Houdini's birth name was Erik Weisz.
13
Today's Puzzles / Re: Fri., 10/17 Pancho Harrison
« Last post by magus on October 18, 2014, 10:02:20 AM »
I think you're right, ktoonces, about two sheets to the wind --- didn't occur to me how clever the clue really is.

LARewind --- went to the site you provided but neither rope nor line appears.  I read Chapman's when I sailed, and as I recall, sailors use rope generically and depending on its use it can be a sheet, halyard, or line.
14
Today's Puzzles / Sat., 10/18 Julian Lim
« Last post by magus on October 18, 2014, 09:57:28 AM »
THEME:   none
   
GOOD ONES:    
Lee side: Abbr.   CSA [I though weather not generals]   
TV cooking show?   BREAKING BAD [meth cooking]   
Juice amounts?   WATTS   
Encouraging start?   ATTA [atta boy!]   
   
BTW:   
Like some self-appointed critics   ARTSY [don't see how they're relatated --- why is a self-appointed critic artsy, or what's artsy about being a self-appointed critic --- any adjective, e.g. tall, could define ARTSY and be as apt]   
   
Dollar bill depiction, familiarly   US SEAL [that is the Great Seal, and what is "familiar" about it?]   
   
Guess I'm too old to comment fairly on "Super Mario Galaxy systems"; ARYA Stark; WAR CRAFT based on "Azeroth"; "Raise Your Glass" singer; the singer PINK (just saw the group PINK on Kimmel); but it appears these puzzles continue to stress pop culture over traditional culture, and for a curmudgeon like me I say, "Bah, humbug!"  And, isn't curmudgeon a SEXIST term?  It is never applied to women.  What about references to the culture of good, old Euro males, like George Eliot!   
   
   
RATING:    ;D ;D
Three grins = Loved it; Two grins = Enjoyed it; One grin = A bit bland for my taste; One teardrop = Not much fun   
15
General Discussion / Re: Looking for a test solver
« Last post by Jonathan L. O'Rourke on October 18, 2014, 03:50:08 AM »
That's great!  I've just sent my most recent puzzle to you.

- Jonathan
16
General Discussion / Re: Looking for a test solver
« Last post by admin on October 18, 2014, 02:29:23 AM »
Hey Jonathan, I sent my email. Looking forward to trying your puzzles!

-km
17
Today's Puzzles / Re: Fri., 10/17 Pancho Harrison
« Last post by LARadioRewind on October 17, 2014, 08:56:28 PM »
Sailors don't call ropes "ropes." Depending on what they're used for, they are "sheets" or "halyards" or "lanyards" or "bobstays" or.....well, you can learn about the different ropes at http://phrontistery.info/nautical.html

And here is the 1978 country hit by Jacky Ward and Reba McEntire, Three Sheets In The Wind: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XJiNKw3vV9I

We learn a lot on the Cruciverb site! ;)
18
Today's Puzzles / Re: Fri., 10/17 Pancho Harrison
« Last post by ktoonces on October 17, 2014, 06:52:48 PM »
Funny, I just remarked to my husband that I really didn't know what "three sheets to the wind" meant. Having served in the Navy, he explained it to me the same way.
19
Today's Puzzles / Re: Fri., 10/17 Pancho Harrison
« Last post by LARadioRewind on October 17, 2014, 05:20:23 PM »
On sailing ships, the ropes that secure the sails are called "sheets." When three of the four sheets come loose, the sail flaps wildly in the wind and the ship starts to rock and sway. I suppose drunks do the same thing: rock and sway. :)

In addition to Once Upon A Time and Wind Beneath My Wings, todays puzzle also included Time In A Bottle (ATIMEBOTTLE) and Moon Over Miami (MOONMIAMI). All four theme answers were vertical. I've been coming up with hundreds of other song titles that would fit, such as Blue On Blue (BLUEBLUE), Time After Time (TIMETIME), Upside Down (EDISPU), You're In My Heart (MYYOUREHEART)  and Tangled Up In Blue (BLDELGNATUE). A hoirizontal answer could be TEG, for Get Back.

Today's puzzle is the fifth in two weeks to include SSTS. This time the clue was "Droop-nosed fliers."
20
Today's Puzzles / Re: Fri., 10/17 Pancho Harrison
« Last post by ktoonces on October 17, 2014, 11:26:30 AM »
I thought this was a great puzzle too.
The Bette Midler song was "Wind Beneath My Wings".
I have always heard "drunk" as being three sheets to the wind so two sheets would be tipsy.
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