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11
Today's Puzzles / Sat., 10/18 Julian Lim
« Last post by magus on October 18, 2014, 09:57:28 AM »
THEME:   none
   
GOOD ONES:    
Lee side: Abbr.   CSA [I though weather not generals]   
TV cooking show?   BREAKING BAD [meth cooking]   
Juice amounts?   WATTS   
Encouraging start?   ATTA [atta boy!]   
   
BTW:   
Like some self-appointed critics   ARTSY [don't see how they're relatated --- why is a self-appointed critic artsy, or what's artsy about being a self-appointed critic --- any adjective, e.g. tall, could define ARTSY and be as apt]   
   
Dollar bill depiction, familiarly   US SEAL [that is the Great Seal, and what is "familiar" about it?]   
   
Guess I'm too old to comment fairly on "Super Mario Galaxy systems"; ARYA Stark; WAR CRAFT based on "Azeroth"; "Raise Your Glass" singer; the singer PINK (just saw the group PINK on Kimmel); but it appears these puzzles continue to stress pop culture over traditional culture, and for a curmudgeon like me I say, "Bah, humbug!"  And, isn't curmudgeon a SEXIST term?  It is never applied to women.  What about references to the culture of good, old Euro males, like George Eliot!   
   
   
RATING:    ;D ;D
Three grins = Loved it; Two grins = Enjoyed it; One grin = A bit bland for my taste; One teardrop = Not much fun   
12
General Discussion / Re: Looking for a test solver
« Last post by Jonathan L. O'Rourke on October 18, 2014, 03:50:08 AM »
That's great!  I've just sent my most recent puzzle to you.

- Jonathan
13
General Discussion / Re: Looking for a test solver
« Last post by admin on October 18, 2014, 02:29:23 AM »
Hey Jonathan, I sent my email. Looking forward to trying your puzzles!

-km
14
Today's Puzzles / Re: Fri., 10/17 Pancho Harrison
« Last post by LARadioRewind on October 17, 2014, 08:56:28 PM »
Sailors don't call ropes "ropes." Depending on what they're used for, they are "sheets" or "halyards" or "lanyards" or "bobstays" or.....well, you can learn about the different ropes at http://phrontistery.info/nautical.html

And here is the 1978 country hit by Jacky Ward and Reba McEntire, Three Sheets In The Wind: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XJiNKw3vV9I

We learn a lot on the Cruciverb site! ;)
15
Today's Puzzles / Re: Fri., 10/17 Pancho Harrison
« Last post by ktoonces on October 17, 2014, 06:52:48 PM »
Funny, I just remarked to my husband that I really didn't know what "three sheets to the wind" meant. Having served in the Navy, he explained it to me the same way.
16
Today's Puzzles / Re: Fri., 10/17 Pancho Harrison
« Last post by LARadioRewind on October 17, 2014, 05:20:23 PM »
On sailing ships, the ropes that secure the sails are called "sheets." When three of the four sheets come loose, the sail flaps wildly in the wind and the ship starts to rock and sway. I suppose drunks do the same thing: rock and sway. :)

In addition to Once Upon A Time and Wind Beneath My Wings, todays puzzle also included Time In A Bottle (ATIMEBOTTLE) and Moon Over Miami (MOONMIAMI). All four theme answers were vertical. I've been coming up with hundreds of other song titles that would fit, such as Blue On Blue (BLUEBLUE), Time After Time (TIMETIME), Upside Down (EDISPU), You're In My Heart (MYYOUREHEART)  and Tangled Up In Blue (BLDELGNATUE). A hoirizontal answer could be TEG, for Get Back.

Today's puzzle is the fifth in two weeks to include SSTS. This time the clue was "Droop-nosed fliers."
17
Today's Puzzles / Re: Fri., 10/17 Pancho Harrison
« Last post by ktoonces on October 17, 2014, 11:26:30 AM »
I thought this was a great puzzle too.
The Bette Midler song was "Wind Beneath My Wings".
I have always heard "drunk" as being three sheets to the wind so two sheets would be tipsy.
18
Today's Puzzles / Fri., 10/17 Pancho Harrison
« Last post by magus on October 17, 2014, 09:10:44 AM »
THEME:   Song titles with missing prepositions that must be read literally
   
GOOD ONES:    
Gaye/Wells hit… aptly    ONCE A TIME [the song is "Once Upon a Time" and the answer (down) has the word ONCE upon TIME]   
Midler hit … aptly   MY WINGS WIND [the song is "Wind Under My Wings" and the answer (down) has WIND under WIND]   
Neapolitan kin   SPUMONI [I thought cities not pastry]   
Dante's love   AMORE [I thought Beatrice not language]   
   
BTW:   
I thought the cluing throughout was particularly good, except for:   
   
Two sheets to the wind?   TIPSY [the idiom translates to "very drunk," but tipsy means only a little drunk --- and why the question mark?]   
   
   
RATING: ;D ;D ;D   
Three grins = Loved it; Two grins = Enjoyed it; One grin = A bit bland for my taste; One teardrop = Not much fun   
19
General Discussion / Looking for a test solver
« Last post by Jonathan L. O'Rourke on October 17, 2014, 12:49:09 AM »
Hi there,
My name is Jonathan, and I'm looking for a solver to test my crossword puzzles privately and provide some degree of honest feedback, so that I may submit them without having made them public.  I have had a puzzle published in GAMES World of Puzzles as well as a Sunday LA Times puzzle in 2011 ( http://crosswordcorner.blogspot.com/2011/10/sunday-oct-30-2011-jonathan-l-orourke.html ), with a Saturday in the LA Times forthcoming (date t.b.d.). 

Please contact me at jonathan.o [AT] eagles.usm.edu if you are interested, and I will send you a puzzle.  Don't be shy now, go on!   ;D
20
Today's Puzzles / Re: Thu., 10/16 Grabowski & Venzke
« Last post by LARadioRewind on October 16, 2014, 05:29:52 PM »
Well, I have discovered that "today's puzzle" is not today's puzzle...but I'm going to discuss today's puzzle on the "Today's Puzzle" thread even though it's an old puzzle and not today's. Now that you're all thoroughly confused, I shall elucidate. After finally figuring out the answers to the New York Times puzzle that appears in today's Los Angeles Daily News and then looking online to learn more about the puzzle, I discovered that it appeared in the New York Times on September 11. It seems that the local paper runs the Times puzzles five weeks after their original publication. That means that when I comment on them here, I'm discussing a five-week-old puzzle. I'll have to confine my comments to other crosswords and not the belated Times puzzles.

The five-week-old puzzle printed today was described as "the most-discussed puzzle at Lollapuzzoola 7, a tournament held in New York City on August 9." Patrick Blindauer title it "Change of Heart." All the across answers contained three, five, seven or nine letters and the middle letter of each---the "heart"---had to  be changed to another letter so the vertical answers would be correct. The changed letters resulted in real words horizontally but those words no longer matched the clues. The answer to "Computer purchase" was MOUSE but it had to be changed to MOOSE. "Canadian pop singer Lavigne" is AVRIL but the word had to be changed to AVAIL. The "O" and the "A" became part of OAK going down. Blindauer could have skipped the "change of heart" idea and simply written clues to fit the words that appeared in the completed puzzle but of course then it would be just an ordinary puzzle. As it is, the puzzle is rather pointless. The middle letter of every across answer has to be changed so the vertical words make sense. For a puzzle titled "Change of Heart," it might have been better if the middle letter of every word, across and down, had to be changed.....but such a puzzle might have just been doubly frustrating and difficult, especially since none of the answers would match the clues.

Rex Parker's puzzle blog has 229 comments about this one and almost everyone hated it. Among the descriptive adjectives: annoying, confusing, moronic, pointless, cruel, poor, arcane, tedious and arbitrary.

http://rexwordpuzzle.blogspot.com/2014/09/sturdy-tree-in-beech-family-thu-9-11-14.html
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