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1
Today's Puzzles / Sat., 10/25 Barry C. Silk
« Last post by magus on Today at 09:00:36 AM »
THEME:   none
   
GOOD ONES:     
Bulls' arena?   STOCK MARKET [or The Vatican]   
Nice crowd?   TROIS [two's company‚Ķ]   
   
BTW:   
Peaked   ILL [peaked means pale and sickly but not yet ill]   
   
Do OT'S resolve ties or is it the scores that occur in them?   
   
   
RATING:    ;D
Three grins = Loved it; Two grins = Enjoyed it; One grin = A bit bland for my taste; One teardrop = Not much fun   
2
Today's Puzzles / Re: Fri., 10/24 Bruce Haight
« Last post by Jonathan L. O'Rourke on Today at 01:57:18 AM »
I disagree, LARR.  Sgt. Friday the character didn't die -- only his original actor did.  In this particular instance, Ed O'Neill played Sgt. Friday in the 2003-2004 revival.  In general, unless the character dies in-story, it's common to use present-tense verbs to refer to them.  I would say "Jack Webb played one" but "Friday is one."

- Jonathan
3
General Discussion / NYT: Wait for reply before sending another?
« Last post by KXL on October 24, 2014, 10:48:03 PM »
Is there a generally accepted practice of waiting until you hear about one puzzle before you send in another, or is it OK to just keep sending them as you make them up?
4
Today's Puzzles / Re: Fri., 10/24 Bruce Haight
« Last post by LARadioRewind on October 24, 2014, 02:56:34 PM »
"MAGNUMDOPUS"? Yikes! Bruce Haight should be embarrassed by that! And shouldn't the clue for SGT be "Friday was one" instead of "Friday is one"? Jack Webb played Sgt. Joe Friday on Dragnet, which aired from 1952 to 1959 and from 1967 to 1970. Webb died in 1982. He was a police sergeant, at least on television, but he certainly isn't a sergeant now. And those are the facts, Ma'am!
5
General Discussion / Re: Themes as answers?
« Last post by KXL on October 24, 2014, 12:58:50 PM »
That helps.  Thanks.
6
General Discussion / Re: Themes as answers?
« Last post by mmcbs on October 24, 2014, 11:09:49 AM »
BTW, most editors would probably want all the people to be either fictional or real people, not mixed as in my examples . . .
7
General Discussion / Re: Themes as answers?
« Last post by mmcbs on October 24, 2014, 10:21:13 AM »
The "hint" or "revealer" entry is commonly used, in untitled puzzles especially, to help the solver understand a theme that isn't apparent from a normal solving effort. Just a comment on your theme, the names probably need to be those that are only thought of as having an initial (e.g. Johnny B. Goode, T. Rowe Price, J. D. Salinger), and who, without the initial might not be recognized.
8
Today's Puzzles / Fri., 10/24 Bruce Haight
« Last post by magus on October 24, 2014, 09:24:25 AM »
THEME:   Latin phrase with an additional consonant yields humorous results
   
GOOD ONES:     
Latin for "fish trading"?   SQUID PRO QUO [still laughing!]   
Latin for "big idiot"?   MAGNUM DOPUS   
Wild West   MAE   
Hides in the closet?   FURS   
   
BTW:   
Snoozefest   DRAG [haven't heard drag in a millennium]   
Vinyl spinners   LP'S [haven't heard wax in a millennium]   
Friday is one: Abbr.   SGT [haven't heard Joe Friday in a millennium]   
Yikes!   HOLY SMOKES [OMG, haven't heard that in a millennium]   
   
   
RATING:    ;D ;D ;D
Three grins = Loved it; Two grins = Enjoyed it; One grin = A bit bland for my taste; One teardrop = Not much fun   
9
General Discussion / Themes as answers?
« Last post by KXL on October 23, 2014, 10:00:05 PM »
Hi, I'm brand new.  If there is a FAQ I should be reading, could someone please point me to it?  I'm working with the theme of dropped initials from famous people (like Franklin D. Roosevelt, drop to D to just Franklin Roosevelt).  So, I have several examples in my grid.  I'd like to make one of the theme answers near the right bottom "Initial Flush" or "Initial Shock" -- something like that. A common-enough phrase with "Initial" that sort of says what I did.  Is that generally acceptable?  Seems like I sometimes see phrases that hint, but often not.  Thanks.
10
Today's Puzzles / Re: Thu., 10/23 Gareth Bain
« Last post by LARadioRewind on October 23, 2014, 05:36:56 PM »
In the game of Scrabble, each of the common letters A, E, I, O, R, S and T is worth only one point. The rarer letters J and Q are each worth ten points. The daily crossword puzzle always includes several of each of those seven common letters. Puzzles seldom contain words with a J, Q or X. Scrabble players have a good incentive to form words with high-value letters---namely, they want to win the game. Crossword makers have no such incentive---they're just trying to fill a grid with legitimate words. Thus, I was impressed with today's puzzle because it included every letter of the alphabet except V. I wonder if Gareth Bain realized he used 25 letters. Probably not, or he would certainly have come up with a word that included a V so all 26 letters of the alphabet appeared.

For the second time in a week, the puzzle has 42 black squares. Thirty-two used to be standard, then 36. Forty-two is too many---the grids are starting to look like checkerboards!
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