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1
Today's Puzzles / Thu., 10/30 Jerry Edelstein
« Last post by magus on Today at 09:09:58 AM »
THEME:   last word of a phrase is an anagram for a national  capital; hence, CAPITAL LETTERS
   
GOOD ONES:    
Crawled, perhaps   SWAM   
   
BTW:   
I had no idea about what the theme was until after a long while I noticed that MORE is an anagram for Rome, then the rest fell into place.  If I weren't writing this I am certain I would have moved on with my morning.  Hope I saved you the effort.   
   
   
   
RATING: ;D   
Three grins = Loved it; Two grins = Enjoyed it; One grin = A bit bland for my taste; One teardrop = Not much fun   
2
Today's Puzzles / Re: Wed., 10/29 Allan E. Parrish
« Last post by LARadioRewind on October 29, 2014, 05:40:20 PM »
ALERS and NLERS have appeared in several puzzles recently. Any time one crossword creator decides to include an answer that isn't really a word, other puzzle makers will soon be using it. XER, short for "Generation X'er", is another non-word that is appearing more frequently. I don't even think that "Generation X'er" is a legitimate term.

Today's puzzle referenced the old adminition to "mind your P's and Q's" The expression dates from 1779. In the early days of newspaper publishing, all the type had to be set by hand. A large wooden box with around 50 compartments held all the hundreds of thousands of pieces of type. P's and Q's were in adjacent compartments and a typesetter had to be careful to not confuse a P with a Q and vice-versa. Otherwise we might have wound up with a "crossword quzzle."

And today's puzzle included Roman numerals. This is the 21st century. I do not want to see Roman numerals in crosswords. I don't want to see them in copyright data either. Or chapters of a book. Or Super Bowl names. Or titles of movie sequels. Or albums by Chicago. Or.....
3
General Discussion / My new crossword blog
« Last post by Jonathan L. O'Rourke on October 29, 2014, 02:19:11 PM »
Hi Cruciverb,

I thought I'd share a link here to my new blog, wherein I will post crosswords that I have constructed.  I intend to update every Wednesday with a new crossword puzzle. 

http://jon-o.blogspot.com/

- Jonathan
4
Today's Puzzles / Re: Tue., 10/28 Grabowski & Venzke
« Last post by magus on October 29, 2014, 09:30:25 AM »
tkoonces: Actually, both words of a phrase can precede the word mark.

Thanks, Anne.

Rewind: Apparently Mister magus did not know that Bingo was originally called Beano.

What did you read to make you think I didn't know? (I didn't, but that's besides the point   :)  )
5
Today's Puzzles / Wed., 10/29 Allan E. Parrish
« Last post by magus on October 29, 2014, 09:21:54 AM »
THEME:   last word of a phrase rhymes with "muse" --- but it's a covert theme leaving the uninitiated nescient
   
GOOD ONES:    
Place for private dining?   MESS   
Growing concern?   FARM   
   
BTW:   
Part of 10/29/14   SLASH [more formally it's a virgule]   
   
A's and Jay's   ALERS [I liked the rhyme but ALERS does not exist except in Xwords]   
   
   
RATING:    :D
Three grins = Loved it; Two grins = Enjoyed it; One grin = A bit bland for my taste; One teardrop = Not much fun   
6
Today's Puzzles / Re: Tue., 10/28 Grabowski & Venzke
« Last post by LARadioRewind on October 28, 2014, 05:19:08 PM »
Apparently Mister magus did not know that Bingo was originally called Beano. Well.....I have to admit that I didn't know that either. I found a detailed history of Bingo on a site called Strangelife. Beano was so named because when numbers were drawn, game players would use beans to cover the numbers on their cards.

http://www.strangelife.com/bingodoc/bingohist.html

I recently discovered that the New York Times crosswords appearing in the Los Angeles Daily News are not current. Each day's puzzle is a month old. I have no idea why the Daily News has a 30-day "lag." Anyway, the puzzle in today's paper included SLIPSLOP, clued with "Twaddle." Not only is "twaddle" pretty much archaic, "slipslop" is archaic. The Merriam-Webster Dictionary says the word dates from around 1675. It originally meant "watery food" and later "shallow talk or writing." The puzzle also includes UNSTOW, clued with "Take out of an overhead bin, say." "Unstow" is not in the dictionary and I don't see how it can even be a legitimate word. I don't think a person could "unstow" something any more than he could unstore, unhide, unplace, unput or unremove something. I insist that the word "unstow" is unfit to be in a crossword.
7
Today's Puzzles / Re: Tue., 10/28 Grabowski & Venzke
« Last post by ktoonces on October 28, 2014, 02:06:24 PM »
Actually, both words of a phrase can precede the word mark.
8
Today's Puzzles / Tue., 10/28 Grabowski & Venzke
« Last post by magus on October 28, 2014, 09:30:13 AM »
THEME:   last word of a phrase can describe a MARK
   
GOOD ONES:     
"Remember what I said" {& theme}   MARK MY WORDS ["Mark me, mark me, O mark me" came to mind]   
Completed the course?   ATE ["Needs no question mark from hell tell us this!" --- probably from the same act in Hamlet]   
   
BTW:   
Chapter in a geology text, maybe   ERA [more likely eon in geology; era in history]   
   
Wonder what per cent of bingo players are on BEANO pills?    :)
   
   
RATING:    ;D
Three grins = Loved it; Two grins = Enjoyed it; One grin = A bit bland for my taste; One teardrop = Not much fun   
9
Today's Puzzles / Re: Mon., 10/27 Jeffrey Wechsler
« Last post by LARadioRewind on October 27, 2014, 05:06:25 PM »
I always admire anyone who can include several 15-letter phrases in a puzzle. I remember one crossword that contained nine 15-letter phrases: three at the top, three in the center and three at the bottom. I can never understand how anyone can find so many 15-letter phrases that can be stacked in such a way as to allow for 15 intersecting vertical words.

Such puzzles, unfortunately, tend to include a higher number of overused Crosswordese words. Today's included ACED, ADD, ATM, ECRU, EDAM, ETA, ETES, ICE, IRS, LCD, PAL, REF, SEE and SST. Oh yeah---SST. This is the sixth L.A. Times puzzle this month to include SST. This time the clue was "Former Air France jet, briefly."
10
General Discussion / Re: Feeling on two words?
« Last post by mmcbs on October 27, 2014, 04:20:30 PM »
I'd avoid PEAKY. It doesn't seem to be in general use in the sense of sickly, it's contrived in the sense of having a peak. Peaky Blinders was a gang in England that they've recently made a TV show about. That's probably pretty obscure, too.

ELEA probably OK - many terms from classical literature, ancient history,  and mythology are fair game.
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