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1
Today's Puzzles / Re: Thu., 3/5 C.C. Burnikel
« Last post by magus on Today at 09:16:06 AM »
So now I know why I also hated The Tonight Show theme.  Paul Anka!  (But I have to admit I did like "My Way.")
2
Today's Puzzles / Fri., 3/6 Steve Marron
« Last post by magus on Today at 09:09:27 AM »
THEME:   I's removed from team names
   
GOOD ONES:    
Sports cliché [& theme]   THERE'S NO I IN TEAM   
Pre-game decision makers   TOSSES [never thought of a coin as making a decision]   
   
BTW:   
Grey wrote one in a churchyard   ELEGY [that's what the title said, but he wrote it at his desk]   
   
Ray or Jay   ALER [would be a good clue if ALER were a real word used by anyone ever]   
   
This puzzle got to me because so much didn't fit.  Not until I got to the theme clue did I have a chance to solve it.   
   
RATING: ;D ;D   
Three grins = Loved it; Two grins = Enjoyed it; One grin = A bit bland for my taste; One teardrop = Not much fun   
3
Today's Puzzles / Re: Thu., 3/5 C.C. Burnikel
« Last post by LARadioRewind on March 05, 2015, 06:58:07 PM »
She's A Lady was written by Paul Anka, who also wrote a 1959 hit for Annette Funicello, It's Really Love. Anka later reworked the melody and it became the theme song for The Tonight Show.

"Buss" as a synonym for kiss is believed to be either a blend of the French baiser and the Middle English verb kissen or an adaptation of the 16th-century Scottish Gaelic word bus, which meant "mouth or lips" and is also the word from which we derived "puss" as a slang word for a person's face.
4
Today's Puzzles / Re: Wed., 3/4 Don Gagliardo
« Last post by LARadioRewind on March 05, 2015, 06:49:09 PM »
I checked with Chico Marx and he confirmed, "At'sa right, 'isola' is-a the Italiano word for-a 'island.'" That clue was probably better than referencing the tiny town of Isola in Mississippi or the board game with that name (short for "Isolation"):

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Isola_(board_game)
5
Today's Puzzles / Re: Wed., 3/4 Don Gagliardo
« Last post by rbe on March 05, 2015, 12:02:43 PM »
True, but it wasn't clued as a place name as was ___la Plata. I think the clue asked for the Italian word for island.
6
Today's Puzzles / Re: Wed., 3/4 Don Gagliardo
« Last post by magus on March 05, 2015, 09:08:50 AM »
rbe---

Isola is used in place names, so in my world they are okay.
7
Today's Puzzles / Thu., 3/5 C.C. Burnikel
« Last post by magus on March 05, 2015, 09:04:28 AM »
THEME:   chain stores
   
GOOD ONES:     
Mobile setting: Abbr.   ALA [the city not the switch]   
Gets into a seat   ELECTS   
Spare pieces?   RIBS [I thought RIMS]   
Price number   ARIA [Leontyne, the singer and if one considers an aria a number, which is usually a pop song]   
They catch busses at stadiums   KISS CAMS [busses is obs. for kisses]   
Took courses at midnight?   ATE LATE [wonder if there are night schools that run so late --- maybe on the web]   
   
BTW:   
Ryder Cup chant   USA USA ["there's no chanting in golf"]   
   
SHE'S A LADY is a bad memory both in sound and lyric.   
   
RATING: ;D ;D   
Three grins = Loved it; Two grins = Enjoyed it; One grin = A bit bland for my taste; One teardrop = Not much fun   
8
Today's Puzzles / Re: Wed., 3/4 Don Gagliardo
« Last post by LARadioRewind on March 04, 2015, 03:57:43 PM »
The answer for "Additions" was ANDS. I have heard the expression "No ifs, ands or buts" but I was not certain that "and" could properly be used as a noun. Apparently it can not. The Merriam-Webster dictionary does not give any definitions of "and" or "but" as a noun. However, "if" can be a noun meaning "a  stipulation or condition." I will be very unhappy if another puzzle maker uses "and" as a noun...and that's a pretty big if!
9
Today's Puzzles / Re: Wed., 3/4 Don Gagliardo
« Last post by LARadioRewind on March 04, 2015, 03:44:32 PM »
The answer for "Pulling ahead" is FURTHERAWAY. FURTHER originally meant "moreover; in addition; to a greater degree or extent" and FARTHER referred to distance. Because so many millions of people have used FURTHER when they meant FARTHER, such usage has now become acceptable. Dictionaries now say FURTHER is a synonym for FARTHER. I don't like that usage though, nor do I like NAUSEOUS as a synonym for NAUSEATED or COULD CARE LESS as a substitute for COULDN'T CARE LESS. Also, I question if FURTHERAHEAD implies "pulling away." If someone is further ahead---or farther ahead---he has already pulled away.

Today's crossword had eight individual black squares which were not connected to any other black squares, not even diagonally. It's nice to see puzzlemakers experimenting with different patterns. I wonder how easy it would be for someone to create a puzzle in which every black square is separate from the others---no blocks of two or three or four together but each black square unconnected to any others.
10
Today's Puzzles / Re: Wed., 3/4 Don Gagliardo
« Last post by rbe on March 04, 2015, 12:01:46 PM »
"ATOI and ETRE are not used in English --- only Xwords".

Add ISOLA to that list.
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