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1
Today's Puzzles / Sat., Independence Day, Alan Olschwang
« Last post by magus on Today at 08:06:26 AM »
THEME:   none, but there should have been given the day
   
GOOD ONES:    
Miner matters   ORE DEPOSITS   
Infernal flower   LETHE [I thought some weed until I realized it was a flowing river]   
   
BTW:   
Scrutinizes   SIFTS [to scrutinize is to examine closely, to sift is to sort]   
   
Slamming door, perhaps   CUE [and so can a cue be any action whatever]   
   
   
RATING:    ;D ;D
Three grins = Loved it; Two grins = Enjoyed it; One grin = A bit bland for my taste; One teardrop = Not much fun   
2
Today's Puzzles / Re: Thu., 7/2 Robert E. Lee Morris
« Last post by Thomps2525 on July 03, 2015, 08:52:21 PM »
Answer to your first question: Yes, by a very tiny margin.

Answer to your second question: Since 2003, I have written the daily Rewind music/radio/trivia feature for Don Barrett's LARadio.com. Don is a former motion-picture promotion man and former manager of mid-1970s top-40 station "K-100" KIQQ in Los Angeles. After 18 years, he is shutting down the website this month. He was putting in too many hours and not getting much support from the radio community. I will no longer be writing a daily column and I will no longer need to use the LARadioRewind name. I'll be getting rid of it and just using my main screen name, Thomps2525, which is the name I use on most other sites and is the name I should have used when I registered for this site. I don't know why I didn't.
3
Today's Puzzles / Re: Fri., 7/3 Jeffrey Wechsler
« Last post by Thomps2525 on July 03, 2015, 08:46:47 PM »
Here is today's debate topic. The New York Times crossword included NOONE as the answer to "Very sad turnout." By definition, doesn't a "turnout" have to involve at least one person? If no one shows up, then there is no turnout at all, let alone a sad one.

Crossword creator Patrick Berry could have used "Herman's last name," a reference to Herman's Hermits lead singer Peter Noone. The group was together from 1962 to 1971 and had eleven top-ten hits in the US and ten in the UK, including I'm Into Something Good, There's A Kind Of Hush, I'm Henry VIII I Am and Mrs. Brown You've Got A Lovely Daughter. Noone is 67 and still performing with a new group of "Hermits."
4
Today's Puzzles / Re: Thu., 7/2 Robert E. Lee Morris
« Last post by magus on July 03, 2015, 08:51:18 AM »
Do you prefer pustule to zit?

And what happened to Rewind?
5
Today's Puzzles / Fri., 7/3 Jeffrey Wechsler
« Last post by magus on July 03, 2015, 08:48:18 AM »
THEME:   Letter T substituted for by C in phrases
   
GOOD ONES:    
Result of a London tea cart mishap?   ROLLING SCONES   
Downtime for Mars?   PAX [PAX=peace, for the Latin god of war]   
Domestic tearjerker   ONION [I thought soaps, etc.]   
One taking coats, perhaps   HOST [I thought coats of paint on walls]   
Green workers   TRAINEES [I thought eco]   
Copy cats?   MEW [Copy is a verb]   
   
BTW:   
Defensive question   AM I [needs "perhaps" since the question is often not defensive]   
   
Uma's "Pulp Fiction" role   MIA [like yesterday, why select a forgettable supporting character's name of an overrated {IMO} flick?  What's wrong with "Mama ___" or Mia Farrow or "Missing in Action" or "Flag letters" or ...]   
   
   
RATING:    ;D ;D
Three grins = Loved it; Two grins = Enjoyed it; One grin = A bit bland for my taste; One teardrop = Not much fun   
6
Today's Puzzles / Re: Thu., 7/2 Robert E. Lee Morris
« Last post by Thomps2525 on July 02, 2015, 07:46:09 PM »
The Oxford English Dictionary defines PISH as "a natural utterance used to express annoyance, impatience or disgust." It dates from the mid-1500s.

"Proactiv target"---a free plug for a product---was ZIT. I think ZIT and BARF are the two most disgusting words in the English language. "Zit" is defined as "a small inflamed elevation of the skin; a pustule or papule; a pimple: a common symptom in acne." The word dates from 1966 but its origin is unknown.
7
Today's Puzzles / Thu., 7/2 Robert E. Lee Morris
« Last post by magus on July 02, 2015, 08:46:01 AM »
THEME:   anagrams of LEMON found in phrases
   
GOOD ONES:    
Cocktail garnish {& theme}   LEMON TWIST   
Longtime maker of convertibles  CASTRO [not cars but furniture]   
   
BTW:   
"Oh, go on!"   PISH [pshaw!]   
   
Covered in ink   TATTED [double pshaw!: this one means knitted only]   
   
"Airplane!" heroine   ELAINE [why, I wonder, is this character of the zillions of characters in a zillion movies selected for this entry?]   
   
"Elementary" network   CBS [one of the two network shows I DVR [note my hip use of a new verb] because of the portrayal of Holmes by Johnny Lee Miller, who does a fine job but whose work seems to go unrecognized.
   
   
RATING:    ;D ;D
Three grins = Loved it; Two grins = Enjoyed it; One grin = A bit bland for my taste; One teardrop = Not much fun   
   
8
Today's Puzzles / Re: Wed., 7/1 Frank Virzi
« Last post by Thomps2525 on July 01, 2015, 07:38:21 PM »
Bei Mir Bist Du Schoen, also known as Bei Mir Bist Du Schön, was originally titled Bei Mir Bistu Shein. It was written by Hungarian-born vaudeville producer-director-composer Yakov Yakubovitsh, who used the stage name Jacob Jacobs. The song first appeared in a 1932 musical comedy, I Would If I Could. The musical was not a success but the song was. The title means "To me you are beautiful."

My favorite Andrews Sisters song is Six Jerks In A Jeep from the movie Private Buckaroo. I think the main reason I like it is the title. The movie also stars Dick Foran, Shemp Howard, Donald O'Connor, Joe E. Lewis, Mary Wickes, Helen Forrest, Huntz Hall and the Harry James Music Makers. It's a fun movie. Six Jerks In A Jeep is one of twelve songs performed in the film. Here 'tis:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8w7J-rhM_wY
9
Today's Puzzles / Re: Wed., 7/1 Frank Virzi
« Last post by Thomps2525 on July 01, 2015, 07:26:38 PM »
Thank you, Mister magus. I, too, deplore the use of the phrase "Over and out" in movies and tv shows. In radio communications, "over" means "I'm done speaking. Please reply." "Out" means "I'm done speaking and I'm ending this conversation." The Me-TV channel has been re-running the 1965-70 series I Dream Of Jeannie. Larry Hagman played Major Tony Nelson, an astronaut. In several episodes, he ended his radio call by saying "Over and out." It drives me crazy now as much as it did in the '60s!

Today's NEA crossword has 44 black squares. Forty-four! And the grid is only 13x13. Many more black squares and the grid would resemble a checkerboard!
10
Today's Puzzles / Wed., 7/1 Frank Virzi
« Last post by magus on July 01, 2015, 08:28:47 AM »
THEME:   last word of phase is a kind of baseball pitch
   
GOOD ONES:    
Combined with… {theme}   BASE and BALL   
Lamb or Bacon, e.g.: Abbr.   AUTH   
   
BTW:   
Back in the day   ONCE [exactly, so perhaps that is one reason this expression irks me]   
   
Partner of out   OVER [as in "over and out," except that is a movie-only expression --- in the real world, the sign-off is simply "Out"]   
   
She, in San Remo   ESSA [wrong, in L.A.]   
   
"Bei Mir Bist Du Schoen"  was a hit in the '30's, but it's still fun. 
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=swPn8E644sA
    
   
   
RATING: ;D   
Three grins = Loved it; Two grins = Enjoyed it; One grin = A bit bland for my taste; One teardrop = Not much fun   
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