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Today's Puzzles / O no, it's the August 31 crosswords!
« Last post by Thomps2525 on August 31, 2015, 04:12:03 PM »
Four famous people with a palindromic last name appear in today's Daily News crossword by D. Scott Nichols and Zhouqin Burnikel. Zhouqin, who usually calls herself C.C., was born in China and came to the United States in 2001. Since 2008, she has maintained the Los Angeles Times' Crossword Corner blog:

http://crosswordcorner.blogspot.com/

The palindromic names: YOKOONO, DARRYLHANNAH, MONICASELES and 1997-2004 CIA director GEORGETENET.

The theme of Janice Luttrell's Los Angeles Times crossword is TAILEND ("Caboose locale"). The first word of each theme answer can follow TAIL: GATEKEEPER, PIPEDREAM, SPINDOCTOR and WINDCHIME.

"Toy on a string" was KITE. Is a kite really a "toy"? I'm not sure. And "Uncle!" was the clue for IGIVE. When someone is surrendering to an attacker, why does he holler "Uncle"? According to the World Wide Words site, the expression derived from a joke first published in 1891. A man's niece gave him a talking parrot. The bird refused to say "Uncle" when commanded and the man wrung its neck. The parrot survived and began wringing the necks of other birds who refused to say "Uncle."

http://www.worldwidewords.org/qa/qa-say1.htm

Speaking of jokes.....today's Universal crossword includes a punny statement divided into three llines:

OLDLAWYERSNEVER
DIETHEYJUST
LOSETHEIRAPPEAL

"Uncle! Uncle!" :)
2
Today's Puzzles / Re: Fri., 8/28 Jeffrey Wechsler
« Last post by magus on August 31, 2015, 09:11:33 AM »
Good man!
3
General Discussion / Re: Merl Reagle has died
« Last post by Thomps2525 on August 30, 2015, 12:14:03 PM »
On September 6, the Los Angeles Times will introduce a Sunday version of the daily crossword by David Poole. Today, August 30, Merl Reagle's final crossword appeared. During the past week, the Times published several letters from fans of Reagle's puzzles. One man had a unique approach: He tried to fill in only the theme answers. What a challenge! I doubt that any of us could come up with all the clever wordplay that Reagle came up with. He will definitely be missed.
4
Today's Puzzles / Re: Sun., 8/30 Pam Amick Klawitter
« Last post by Thomps2525 on August 30, 2015, 12:08:58 PM »
Merl Reagle, whose pun-filled Sunday crosswords appeared in the Los Angeles Times, Washington Post and 50 other newspapers, died August 22. His final puzzle appears today and I think it is one of his most clever. The theme: "Wiseguy Studies."

Study of babies? CRYOGENICS
Study of punctuation marks? PERIODONTICS
Study of car repair? DENTISTRY
Study of peas? PODIATRY
Study of poker? CARDIOLOGY
Study of voting? ELECTRONICS
Study of cemeteries? CRYPTOLOGY
Study of logic? ERGONOMICS
Study of women's magazines? COSMOLOGY
Study of dwellings? HOMEOPATHY

The Times published several letters from fans of Reagle's puzzles. One man had a unique approach: He tried to fill in only the theme answers. What a challenge! I doubt that any of us could come up with all the clever wordplay that Reagle came up with. He will be missed. David Poole will now be creating the Sunday crosswords.
5
Today's Puzzles / Re: Fri., 8/28 Jeffrey Wechsler
« Last post by Thomps2525 on August 30, 2015, 11:58:56 AM »
Now that I think about it, those three- and four-letter words that appear so frequently in crosswords are not "ill-conceived." Rather, they are probably unavoidable. And I did not mean to imply that we are in a stand-off. At any rate, I am done carping.....and you all know that I'm not the carper I used to be. :)
6
Today's Puzzles / Re: Fri., 8/28 Jeffrey Wechsler
« Last post by magus on August 30, 2015, 10:04:16 AM »
Not really, if after reading my criticism you still believe your peeve is the equivalent of mine.  Knowing the reason, as you now do, short words are repeated should relieve you of your need to denigrate them.  To suggest it is a stand-off seems a way of weakening the validity of my criticism to equate it with your own.  I am, however, pleased that you will no longer carp on what simply cannot be avoided.
7
Today's Puzzles / Sun., 8/30 Pam Amick Klawitter
« Last post by magus on August 30, 2015, 09:55:03 AM »
THEME:   MAN intruding in phrases
   
GOOD ONES:     
One whose citations are always on target?   QUOTATION MARKSMAN [quotation marks]   
Work force breakdown?   MANPOWER FAILURE [power failure]   
Pathfinders and such   NISSANS [I always get fooled on these car answers; I was sure NIMRODS was the answer]   
Subject of a passing concern?  ESTATE [I thought football]   
Some shooters, for short  SLR'S [single lens reflex cameras but I thought guns and peas]   
Where to see available courses   MENUS [thought I was back in college]   
Ian Fleming or James Bond   ETONIANS [all I could think of was that they were male and British --- never saw author and protagonist in the same clue]   
   
BTW:   
Med. Research org.   NIMH [can't help thinking of the delightful novel The Rats of NIMH]   
   
ESLAS and ETRE are not used in English.  [change ESLAS to ELSAS (of the lioness) and there is one less problem, and with ETRE changed to EBRO and a few other easy changes, the puzzle would have been stronger]   
   
   
RATING:    ;D ;D
Three grins = Loved it; Two grins = Enjoyed it; One grin = A bit bland for my taste; One teardrop = Not much fun   
8
Today's Puzzles / Re: Fri., 8/28 Jeffrey Wechsler
« Last post by Thomps2525 on August 29, 2015, 09:30:45 PM »
All right, Mister magus, you consider my comments about overused words to be annoying and ill-conceived and I consider the frequent use of ALE, ALOHA, ASP, EEL, EPEE, IRA, IRE, LEI, ODE, OLE, ORE, OREO and SPA to also be annoying and ill-conceived. In an effort to keep the peace, I will henceforth refrain from commenting on overused words. Happy?
9
Today's Puzzles / Re: Sat., 8/29 Don Gagliardo
« Last post by Thomps2525 on August 29, 2015, 03:27:57 PM »
"Classified times" is AFTS. It took me a while to figure out what the clue means. In classified ads, "afts" is an abbreviation for "afternoons," e.g., "Call 555-1234 afts or eves."

When I was a child, most boys preferred Mickey Mouse Club performer ANNETTE Funicello ("One of the original Mouseketeers") but I liked Karen Pendleton and Darlene Gillespie. Among the other original members were future Lawrence Welk Show regular Bobby Burgess, future My Three Sons co-star Don Agrati (later known as Don Grady) and future singer and The Rifleman co-star Johnny Crawford.
10
Today's Puzzles / Re: Fri., 8/28 Jeffrey Wechsler
« Last post by magus on August 29, 2015, 09:26:15 AM »
Okay, now I'm fed up!  Unless you are a constructor you cannot know how important these "overused" words are in linking longer entries and theme words.  (Words with two vowels in a row are particularly useful.)  Furthermore, the number of three-letter words is small by comparison to longer words, so repetition of them is more likely. 

Now, the term overused is a pejorative suggesting in this case that other words should be used in their stead.  I suggest you try alternatives to see if rarer words can be substituted.  When you fail, perhaps we will no longer have to see your annoying and ill-conceived lists.

Okay, I suppose the same can be said of my carping about ETE and SUS; but I have reason on my side even if the majority in the Xword biz disagrees.  And I offer alternative clues: "Gam ending" for ETE and "Pending intro." for SUS
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