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1
Today's Puzzles / Thu., 9/18 Julian Lim
« Last post by magus on Today at 09:04:46 AM »
THEME:   first word of a phrase is colloquial for good
   
GOOD ONES:     
Beginning auspiciously {& theme}   OFF TO A GOOD START   
Promising words   OATHS   
Site site {twice}   NET; WEB   
   
BTW:   
"You gotta be kidding me!"  AW MAN [it's "Oh, man!" or "Aw gee!"  or just plain "Man!"]

Isn't our language amazing!  WICKED = good (I think beatniks/hippies used BAD for good, but it appears each generation must distinguish itself in the order of cool, which means hip, which means rad, which means with it, which means...)

From his word choices, Julian, I would guess, was educated in England; or as in my case, read lots of British lit.   
   
   
RATING:    ;D ;D
Three grins = Loved it; Two grins = Enjoyed it; One grin = A bit bland for my taste; One teardrop = Not much fun   
2
Today's Puzzles / Re: Wed., 9/17 Gareth Bain
« Last post by LARadioRewind on September 17, 2014, 05:21:52 PM »
Young people probably think that "Rudy Vallee" is a region in France. :)

"Ack!" was a common expression of the titular character in Cathy Guisewite's Cathy strip and of Bill the Cat in Berkeley Breathed's Bloom County, Outland and Opus strips.

I've seen TMI, OMG, LOL, AOL, MSN, IPOD, IPAD and CELEB in a lot of puzzles lately. Crossword makers are probably thankful that modern technology has led to the creation of some new words and abbreviations for them to use.
3
Today's Puzzles / Re: Sat., 9/13 Barry C. Silk
« Last post by LARadioRewind on September 17, 2014, 05:10:59 PM »
I agree that it takes creativity to come up with unusual clues for often-used words such as SST and ALE and IRE, but I would much rather see crossword creators apply their creativity to the words in the puzzle, rather than to the clues. Merl Reagle recently crafted a Sunday crossword with no words shorter than five letters. He used none of the three- and four-letter words that appear far too frequently. I, the tough critic, loved that puzzle.
4
Today's Puzzles / Re: Wed., 9/17 Gareth Bain
« Last post by rbe on September 17, 2014, 01:12:12 PM »
"HIS Master's Voice" and CROONS(ER) Rudy Vallee are a good match --- wonder how many young solvers know these 90-year-old pop culture references. 

I've wondered that too, but then they know the latest rap singer. He could have gone with a more modern crooner like Bing Crosby.  ;)
5
Today's Puzzles / Re: Sat., 9/13 Barry C. Silk
« Last post by magus on September 17, 2014, 09:18:09 AM »
Wow!  You're a tough critic.  I think using new clues for frequently used fill is creative.
6
Today's Puzzles / Wed., 9/17 Gareth Bain
« Last post by magus on September 17, 2014, 09:15:52 AM »
THEME:   first word of a phrase can describe coconut
   
GOOD ONES:    
Fruit that can {theme}   COCONUT   
People people   CELEBS [People magazine subjects, not some affable types]   
   
BTW:   
"No more details, please!"   TMI [has this become so familiar that the clue need not indicate it is a texting abbreviation?  (In truth, though I don't "text," I somehow knew the term.)]   
   
Comic strip cry   ACK [I wouldn't know about comics, but I know this is not a real word but an abbr. for acknowledgement]   
   
"HIS Master's Voice" and CROONS(ER) Rudy Vallee are a good match --- wonder how many young solvers know these 90-year-old pop culture references.   
   
   
RATING:    ;D
Three grins = Loved it; Two grins = Enjoyed it; One grin = A bit bland for my taste; One teardrop = Not much fun   
7
Today's Puzzles / Re: Tue., 9/16 Grabowski & Venzke
« Last post by LARadioRewind on September 16, 2014, 07:03:06 PM »
The word GET appears backwards. The "get back" theme should be obvious to anyone who solves the Cryptic Crosswords in Games magazine.

By the way, Mister magus, I love the way that you creaTE Grins for each puzzle. ;)
8
Today's Puzzles / Re: Sat., 9/13 Barry C. Silk
« Last post by LARadioRewind on September 16, 2014, 06:58:10 PM »
Three days after SSTS appeared in a puzzle, SSTS has appeared in a puzzle. The abbreviation is in the September 16 Los Angeles Times crossword, clued with "Former Mach 2 fliers, briefly." The earlier occurrence of the abbreviation was clued with "Bygone boomers." Puzzle makers can keep coming up with different clues for the same Crosswordese words but it doesn't hide the fact that the puzzle answers are much too repetitious.
9
Software / Technical / Re: Best software for one-time constructor
« Last post by JonahP on September 16, 2014, 06:18:06 PM »
I don't know of a tool with autofill that retails for less than $40-$60.  Without autofill, there's a great tool (full disclosure: I made it) that's $19.95 for unlimited puzzles or $3.95 for a single puzzle: http://CrosswordHobbyist.com

Crossword Hobbyist supports newspaper-style puzzles or teacher-style puzzles.  (The main link within the site is to teacher-style puzzles, making a newspaper-style puzzle is accessible from your home page).
10
General Discussion / Re: Unfillable Grid
« Last post by j88keys on September 16, 2014, 05:40:34 PM »
Thanks Bill- From what you describe, CrossFire works the same way- just glad to know that there's not an "easier fix" that I'm not taking advantage of in the software. Thanks for your response.

JIM
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